plucking arrow after arrow from an unfailing quiver, let fly

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SuprunP

Senior Member
Ukrainian & Russian
And then he saw Bellgrove galloping like a horse on all fours with Titus on his back. Through the ravine of terrible darkness and up the slopes of pine-covered mountains he galloped, his white mane blowing out behind his head while Titus, plucking arrow after arrow from an unfailing quiver, let fly at everything in view until, the image dwindling in the Doctor's brain, he lost them in the dire shade of the night.
(Gormenghast; Marvyn Peake)

Shouldn't there be more specificity, so to say, for example, 'while Titus, plucking arrow after arrow from an unfailing quiver, let them/the arrows fly at everything in view...'?

Thanks.


 
  • dadane

    Senior Member
    English-London
    That is the basic idea but the original is fine. 'Titus let fly ...' is the underlying sentence, 'plucking the arrows from and unfailing quiver' is an additional descriptive clause. 'Let fly' is a phrasal verb, and a very effective one, it doesn't necessarily require arrows.
    Cross-posted
     
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