plural of adjectives ending with ה

Le Bélier

Senior Member
USA
English/USA
I'm having a mental block.:confused: I think that I read at one time that when forming the plural of adjectives ending in ה, the letter is dropped before adding the suffix, for example, קַשֶׁה, קָשָׁה, קָשִׁים, קָשׁות, right?
 
  • Tamar

    Senior Member
    Israel, Hebrew
    קַשֶׁה, קָשָׁה, קָשִׁים, קָשׁות
    these are definitely correct.
    I don't know if that's a rule, but it makes sens the ה would drop.
     

    amikama

    a mi modo
    עברית
    I'm having a mental block.:confused: I think that I read at one time that when forming the plural of adjectives ending in ה, the letter is dropped before adding the suffix, for example, קַשֶׁה, קָשָׁה, קָשִׁים, קָשׁות, right?
    You got the rule right. However there are few exceptions to this rule:
    גבוה - גבוהה - גבוהים - גבוהות
    כמה - כמהה - כמהים - כמהות
    תמוה - תמוהה - תמוהים - תמוהות
    מהוה - מהוהה - מהוהים - מהוהות
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    You got the rule right. However there are few exceptions to this rule:
    גבוה - גבוהה - גבוהים - גבוהות
    כמה - כמהה - כמהים - כמהות
    תמוה - תמוהה - תמוהים - תמוהות
    מהוה - מהוהה - מהוהים - מהוהות
    What does כמה mean as an adjective?

    As for the others, I think the ה is maintained because they follow the same pattern as גדול (and many other adjectives) - three consonants with a ו between the second and the third - and ה simply happens to be the third consonant.

    There's probably a more formal linguistic way to put it, but I think you get what I mean anyway. :)
     

    Flaminius

    coclea mod
    日本語 / japāniski / יפנית
    Letter ה at the end of a word is a consonant only when it is marked by mappiq (a dot in the centre; no different from dagesh for other consonants). For example, גָּבוֹהַּ or gavoah is marked by a ה with mappiq. The word is derived from a root with three consonants; g-b-h.

    A final ה without mappiq is not part of the root but a vowel sign which came into existence before Tiberian vocalisation (Edit: In fact you get Greek and Latin scripts «E», if you write the letter quickly from left to right). The root for קַשֶׁה does not consist of q-š-h. Perhaps native speakers could chime in and tell us what the root and the pattern are that derive קַשֶׁה?
     
    Last edited:

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Letter ה at the end of a word is a consonant only when it is marked by mappiq (a dot in the centre; no different from dagesh for other consonants). For example, גָּבוֹהַּ or gavoah is marked by a ה with mappiq. The word is derived from a root with three consonants; g-b-h.

    A final ה without mappiq is not part of the root but a vowel sign which came into existence before Tiberian vocalisation (Edit: In fact you get Greek and Latin scripts «E», if you write the letter quickly from left to right). The root for קַשֶׁה does not consist of q-š-h. Perhaps native speakers could chime in and tell us what the root and the pattern are that derive קַשֶׁה?
    Yes! :thumbsup: That was my intuitive explanation as well, and it's sort of what I tried to express in my earlier post.

    The ה in קשה simply feels different from the one in גבוה. I think one indicator of the difference is that a ה of the latter type has a patach.
    כָּמֵהַּ = longing, yearning
    Thanks. :) This word seems to be no exception to the pattern Flaminius and I have described (he better than I :)).
     
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