Plural of YOU

supercrom

Banned
Homo peruvianus, practising AE n' learning BE
I don't know what it means...



I think it should be related to you all... I am not sure about it. Can anybody help me?

By the way, the pic above tries to convey a meaning... He is John M. Lipsky, a linguist who also speaks spanish very fluently.

Thanks in advance.

 
  • Artrella

    Banned
    BA
    Spanish-Argentina
    cromteaches said:
    I don't know what it means...



    I think it should be related to you all... I am not sure about it. Can anybody help me?

    By the way, the pic above tries to convey a meaning... He is John M. Lipsky, a linguist who also speaks spanish very fluently.

    Thanks in advance.




    Hola Crom!! Qué será? >>> Qué parte de "todos ustedes" no entienden???

    Qué es lo qué querés saber? Lo que dice el polo de este hombre? O el sentido figurado de esta pregunta?

    Saludos, ARt :) ;) :p
     

    rainy7

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    Hi. I left the same the message on your other post but you seem to have changed the thread, so here it is again:

    You are right, it means "you all".

    This abbreviated way of saying it ("y'all") is common in the USA (I would say especially so in the southern states), but is not really used in any other English speaking countries, as far as I know.
    If you said it here, in England, it would be as if you were mimicking the accent of an American.

    Well, I'll wait to see what the foreros from the USA have to say about this, anyway.

    Saludos.
     

    David

    Banned
    Outside the South, it is only used humorously. In the South, it is considered the plural form of you, and yes, it comes from the two words you and all. It is never written, even in the South, in formal writing, though of course it is often used in literary dialogue. "What part of y'all don't you understand" is meant to be a satirical question, directed at Northerners who claim they don't know what y'all means. There is a certain tension in North/South humor. For example, during the oil crisis of the 1970's, bumper stickers were seen on many cars in the South (I saw them), where States such as Texas, Louisiana, etc., produce oil, reading, "Let the bastards freeze!" Northerners tend to look down on Southerners as uneducated, and Southerners don't like it. Of course when you have a President who can't speak English very well, it bring out the worst in us Northerners.
     

    David

    Banned
    Si uno dice, Malinche es el nombre de una mujer, dice la verdad, pero no indica el significado en el contexto histórico, el sentido figurado, como dice Artrella, del nombre. Un poco de contexto o reseña puede ayudar. "What part of sth don´t you understand," is a common and contentious satirical question. "What part of ´Do your homework´ didn´t you understand?" "What part of 'Get off my property' didn´t you understand"? That´s what the question means.
     

    Artrella

    Banned
    BA
    Spanish-Argentina
    el_novato said:
    Qué parte de todos ustedes. Artrella ya dió la respuesta.

    :confused: Imagino que es algo como esto
    Es como decir, quién de ustedes (quién de todos ustedes), de ustedes quiénes?



    Sí...a veces las comunicaciones fallan ...

    Bueno Novatín, te quiero corregir "dio" va sin tilde ( y no es una anfibología ni nada por el estilo)

    Los monosílabos FUE-FUI-VIO Y DIO no llevan tilde.


    Abrazos, Art :) ;) :p
     

    supercrom

    Banned
    Homo peruvianus, practising AE n' learning BE
    Joe Tamargo said:
    Y'all indeed means you all and is the plural of the word you in the southeastern United States, south of the Ohio River. Also encountered, especially in Appalachia (the area of the Appalachian Mountains which extend from south central New York to central Alabama) are you'uns (you ones), yin and other forms, all of which mean the same thing. The form is not considered entirely correct nor appropriate for writing.
    Very interesting explanation, Joe.

    Thanx
     

    supercrom

    Banned
    Homo peruvianus, practising AE n' learning BE
    Artrella said:
    Sí...a veces las comunicaciones fallan ...

    Bueno Novatín, te quiero corregir "dio" va sin tilde ( y no es una anfibología ni nada por el estilo)

    Los monosílabos FUE, FUI, VIO y DIO no llevan tilde.

    Abrazos, Art :) ;) :p
    Hola, Artrella

    Todos los de arriba son monosílabos y, como tales, no se tildan. Empero, me gustaría añadir el ya clásico TI, muchos lo tildan por analogía con mí y sí, pero estos últimos tienen otros significados, en cambio, ti sólo uno (pronombre de segunda persona singular).

    A propo', voy a ver si publico algo sobre el tema...

    Chaucito
     

    Joe Tamargo

    Senior Member
    United States English
    I forgot to add that you all is used in Black English, and if you use it to them as the plural of the word you they will accept it without batting an eye. They don't like the expression you people, considering it racist.

    It sometimes seems to me that if a white person in the United States says anything at all about race (even "Black is beautiful") he will immediately be labelled a racist. There is also the widespread unspoken assumption that any white person who mentions race is of the lower classes. This last was pointed out by the author Tom Wolfe.

    But while we are on the subject, it has got to be at least partly true that the black people were awarded their own "language" because it doesn't cost any money.

    Mr. Lipsky's T-shirt is an expression of pride of place.
     

    Philippa

    Senior Member
    Britain - English
    Artrella said:
    Los monosílabos FUE-FUI-VIO Y DIO no llevan tilde.
    Hola Art!
    So these have no accent because if they're only one syllable there's no point because it's stressed already, right? Can you (or someone else who knows everything!) tell me if there's a reason why the other ones in the pretérito indefinido don't have accents either.
    Such as dije, dijo, estuve, estuvo, hice, hizo etc. Presumably the stress falls on the bits I've underlined because they all end in vowels, but why is that different to all the regular ones where the stress is on the final syllable hablé, habló, viví, vivió etc?
    Thanks, folks!
    Philippa :)
     

    elroy

    Imperfect mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Philippa said:
    Hola Art!
    So these have no accent because if they're only one syllable there's no point because it's stressed already, right? Can you (or someone else who knows everything!) tell me if there's a reason why the other ones in the pretérito indefinido don't have accents either.
    Such as dije, dijo, estuve, estuvo, hice, hizo etc. Presumably the stress falls on the bits I've underlined because they all end in vowels, but why is that different to all the regular ones where the stress is on the final syllable hablé, habló, viví, vivió etc?
    Thanks, folks!
    Philippa :)

    Stress is an intrinsic part of a word, and something that written Spanish conveys perfectly through the presence or absence of the written accent marks (tildes). In regular verbs in the preterite, the stress naturally falls on the last syllables in the forms you mentioned. Because the Spanish rule states that any word that ends in a vowel (without a written accent) should be stressed on the penultimate syllable, these words need the written accent to indicate that they are an exception (to the rules of accentuation, not to the rules of conjugation, which they do, of course, follow).

    Now, part of what makes those other verbs irregular is that, apart from the fact that they undergo radical changes (radical meaning within the root, not extreme or fanatic or anything), the stress falls on the penultimate syllable instead of the last one. This is simply the way the word is. It cannot be negotiated, but what can and should be done to it is indicate it in writing. Since the rule already states that words ending in vowels are stressed on the penultimate syllable, there is no need to add a written accent.

    I hope this helps!
     

    basurero

    Senior Member
    uk
    Here in Aussie I hear a lot of people adding an s to you to make it plural in informal speech.

    eg.
    "What are you's doing?"
     

    Leopold

    Senior Member
    España - Español
    cromteaches said:
    Hola, Artrella

    Todos los de arriba son monosílabos y, como tales, no se tildan. Empero, me gustaría añadir el ya clásico TI, muchos lo tildan por analogía con mí y sí, pero estos últimos tienen otros significados, en cambio, ti sólo uno (pronombre de segunda persona singular).

    A propo', voy a ver si publico algo sobre el tema...

    Chaucito
    ¿De verdad usáis "empero" y "a propo' " en el discurso hablado por allá, cromteaches? Fascinante.

    L.
     

    Philippa

    Senior Member
    Britain - English
    elroy said:
    they undergo radical changes (radical meaning within the root, not extreme or fanatic or anything
    :D :D

    Hi elroy!
    Thankyou very much
    I wondered whether it was just part of their irregularily!
    Saludos
    Philippa :)
     

    cristóbal

    Senior Member
    EEUU/Inglés
    David said:
    Outside the South, it is only used humorously. In the South, it is considered the plural form of you, and yes, it comes from the two words you and all. It is never written, even in the South, in formal writing, though of course it is often used in literary dialogue. "What part of y'all don't you understand" is meant to be a satirical question, directed at Northerners who claim they don't know what y'all means. There is a certain tension in North/South humor. For example, during the oil crisis of the 1970's, bumper stickers were seen on many cars in the South (I saw them), where States such as Texas, Louisiana, etc., produce oil, reading, "Let the bastards freeze!" Northerners tend to look down on Southerners as uneducated, and Southerners don't like it. Of course when you have a President who can't speak English very well, it bring out the worst in us Northerners.

    Agreed. HOWEVER, I would challenge the claim that it's never written in formal writing, even in the South. :)
    Y'all is an integral part of many a southerners vocabulary including my own, unfortunately, most of them spell it "ya'll" and I go to great lengths trying to eradicate that mistake. :)

    But we also fall prey to the "you guys" that youse Northerners like to use.
     

    te gato

    Senior Member
    Alberta--TGE (te gato English)
    cristóbal said:
    Agreed. HOWEVER, I would challenge the claim that it's never written in formal writing, even in the South. :)
    Y'all is an integral part of many a southerners vocabulary including my own, unfortunately, most of them spell it "ya'll" and I go to great lengths trying to eradicate that mistake. :)

    But we also fall prey to the "you guys" that youse Northerners like to use.
    Hola;
    Just to add to the fun words, here in Canada we often say "Hay you guys" and for "You-all" it is turned into "Yo". Although we do NOT!!! say "AY" as in "Canada Ay". I have no idea how that started.
    Besos
    Karen:D
     

    supercrom

    Banned
    Homo peruvianus, practising AE n' learning BE
    te gato said:
    Hola;
    Just to add to the fun words, here in Canada we often say "Hay you guys" and for "You-all" it is turned into "Yo". Although we do NOT!!! say "AY" as in "Canada Ay". I have no idea how that started.
    Besos
    Karen:D

    Buen aporte, Karen

    I thought that "yo" used to mean "your" in very colloquial language. E.g. D'ya have all yo money?.

    ;)
     

    te gato

    Senior Member
    Alberta--TGE (te gato English)
    cromteaches said:
    Buen aporte, Karen

    I thought that "yo" used to mean "your" in very colloquial language. E.g. D'ya have all yo money?.

    ;)

    It can be but here in Canada we use very unusual words.."yo" we use as a shortened form of "hay you"!! Example: "yo, want to go out tonight?"...to complicate matters even more, we would say "yo, wanna go out tonight?"
    We are verygood at making things complicated!!!
    check ya later
    karen;)
     

    mjscott

    Senior Member
    American English
    Y'all means youse guys in Noreastern US terms.
    :rolleyes:

    Also, I would like to add to the accent rules:
    1) If a word ends in a vowel, n, or s, its natural accentuation is on the penultimate (second to the last) syllable. (habla, hablan, hablas)
    2) If a word ends in any other letter, its natural accentuation is on the ultimate (last) syllable. (hablar)
    3) If you know what the last letter is in the word, and its pronunciation does not follow one of the above two words, it needs an accent mark.

    Examples:
    Habló ends in a vowel but is not stressed on the penultimate (second to the last) syllable—therefore it needs an accent mark.

    Lápiz does not end in a vowel, n, or s; but is not stressed on the ultimate (last) syllable—therefore it needs an accent mark.

    If you write the following two last names, the above rules are why one carries an accent mark over the a and the other doesn’t:

    González
    Gonzales

    Exceptions still exist, such as:
    éste use as a noun as opposed to este used as an adjective;

    sí (meaning yes) and si (meaning if)
     

    jaykemin

    Senior Member
    English
    You-all is just like you're the speaker and you impart knowledge to your audience. For example, You-all should be aware of what is happening to the surrounding.

    Of course, them and they is a different story..
     
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