Polar-Bear-Club restaurant

twinklestar

Senior Member
Chinese
[I assume you mean a "normal" restaurant, but I think the same would apply even in a quaint, cheesy, or Polar-Bear-Club restaurant (or a "topless and bottomless" restaurant). (Pardon me, I just couldn't resist the chance to "tie it all together".)]
Hi! Could someone tell me what 'Polar-Bear-Club' means? And what does "topless and bottomless" restaurant refer to?

Thanks!
 
  • bibliolept

    Senior Member
    AE, Español
    What's the context? "Polar bear club" usually describes groups of presumably otherwise sane people who like a swim in freezing waters. "Topless and bottomless" sounds like a reference to an adult entertainment venue featuring fully nude performers.
     

    twinklestar

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    What's the context? "Polar bear club" usually describes groups of presumably otherwise sane people who like a swim in freezing waters. "Topless and bottomless" sounds like a reference to an adult entertainment venue featuring fully nude performers.
    Hi bibliolept,

    Thanks for your answer.

    Here's the more context and the URL.
    "We wear a smile" taken by itself tends to sound illogical. Then, after we understand that it is not meant to be taken literally, we imagine other places we may have heard such an expression, quaint, cheesy, or Polar-Bear-Club places.

    It was in the context of restaurant waiters smiling that I could see a purpose for the singular. It is not literally one smile over all the faces, but a figurative smile, good cheer, that they all could "wear", and in my opinion in that context, "smiles" forces the smiles to be literal or the good cheer to be divisible, so I choose "a smile".

    [I assume you mean a "normal" restaurant, but I think the same would apply even in a quaint, cheesy, or Polar-Bear-Club restaurant (or a "topless and bottomless" restaurant). (Pardon me, I just couldn't resist the chance to "tie it all together".)]
    The quote is from Post 11

    http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=1088744&highlight=
     

    twinklestar

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Hi bibliolept,

    Thank again for your answer.

    Does "Polar-Bear-Club restaurant" refer to the meaning you explained previously? Is it slang? Or is it coined by the poster only?
     

    Franzi

    Senior Member
    (San Francisco) English
    Hi bibliolept,

    Thank again for your answer.

    Does "Polar-Bear-Club restaurant" refer to the meaning you explained previously? Is it slang? Or is it coined by the poster only?
    "Polar Bear Club" is reasonably well known. "Polar Bear Club restaurant" looks like it was made up by the poster. A lot of polar bear clubs swim naked in freezing water. "Topless" bars are places where the hot waitresses wear no shirts. I think the poster was making some kind of joke about restaurants full of old naked people or waitresses wearing neither tops nor bottoms.

    Edited to add: Polar bear clubs are often made up of old people, so perhaps the poster meant restaurants that are "quaint, cheesy, or that cater to your grandpa". You could always private message him/her and ask.

    The wikipedia article on ice swimming mentions the "polar bear" terminology being from the US and Canada: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ice_swimming#North_America
     
    Last edited:

    Forero

    Senior Member
    I was "tying" all the posters ideas together as the group seemed a little giddy. I got the Polar Bear Club idea from this post:
    Perhaps it should be pointed out that wearing a smile, and nothing else, is apt to be chilly, particularly in a Manitoba winter.
    I think Winnipeg, Manitoba, is one of the Polar Bear Club's favourite venues. "Cheesy" fit the restaurant as well as the song about wearing a smile mentioned in one of the other posts.
     
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