"polite and well-bred"

Julia_G

New Member
Russian
Hello everyone!

I'm writing a letter of reference for a colleague of mine. Does the phrase "Mr. X is also very polite with colleagues and well-bred" sound ok? The letter should be rather formal, but preferrably not "old-fashioned".

The whole body of the letter is below:

December 15, 2014

To Whom It May Concern:

Mr. X, b. 1990, was employed as a line operator and line supervisor by the limited liability company "QWERTY" from 30.07.2012 through 08.12.2014.
As the line supervisor Mr. X was responsible for management of the line for ready-to-cook products, management of the shift personnel, line supervision and product quality.
Through the course of his work with our company Mr. X has gained a reputation of a responsible, disciplined and efficient specialist.
Mr. X commanded a huge amount of respect in the team and was always very polite and well-bred with colleagues.
 
  • syvelocin

    New Member
    English - American
    I would probably change "well-bred" in the context of the last sentence; it doesn't sound right to say "well-bred with colleagues" but you can say he is "a well-bred man." Well-mannered would sound a bit better.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    I struggle to imagine him breeding with his colleagues. I think you mean 'well-mannered' or 'courteous', but you've already said 'polite', so you seem to be over-egging the pudding.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    I think the description 'well-bred' is very old-fashioned and rather offensive if it's supposed to be a recomendation, if not meaningless, these days, unless it's being used facetiously of course. Or as an insult, as in 'Yes he is well-bred - a well-bred idiot'.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    "Well bred" suggests to me that the co-workers had access to his family tree and examined the earlier matings.

    I suspect that co-workers would be more interested in his behavior than his breeding.

    So "polite and friendly" or "polite and convivial", etc.
     
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