politicking

leo123

Member
English
In the sentence below I used the word 'politicking'; because I was not sure of the correct usage, I turned to the source I most often use and trust: the Merriam-Webster. The term did not register (I used www . m-w . com [I can't post URLs]) which I found odd. When I googled the term, however, I did find various sites with definitions of the word (mostly the definition I was expecting). Since I'm not very comfortable with the word yet I figured I would put it here as a question: Is my usage correct?

To provide some context, this is for an academic paper. The fear I have is that the word might have an informal nature, making its use improper.

Thanks very much in advance.

Leo

"Europe
’s historical engine, Germany and France, is perhaps the greatest example of prudent and effective soft power politicking."
 
  • rodoke

    Senior Member
    en-US; .us
    Nothing wrong with it that I can see; you didn't use it improperly at all.

    Strange, though, that it wouldn't be in a dictionary. I remember grade school grammar books that used that word (to explain the politic-politicking change).
     

    Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    To provide some context, this is for an academic paper. The fear I have is that the word might have an informal nature, making its use improper.


    I'm actually on the same page as you are, Leo. You've used it properly for the context but I've always felt that "politicking" is a "gimmicky" word. There's something almost "slangy" about it. It may be simply that it's a harsh-sounding word but I would never use it because I'm not comfortable with it, either. Doesn't really answer your question but if you're not comfortable with the word, I would find some other way to say it.
     

    leo123

    Member
    English
    Thank you both for your replies. I was surprised it wasn't in the m-w as well. I might consider changing it, though that will depend on my inspiration I suppose!
     

    MissFit

    Senior Member
    I found politicking in an American Heritage College dictionary (published 1993.) It is not listed as slang or informal. I believe the word has become mainstream and is widely used by politicians and journalists--even historians and scholars.

    I suggest that you hypenate soft-power since the two words function together as one adjective.
     
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