pongobin

  • duckie

    Senior Member
    Denmark
    :p

    Learning English is almost exactly like learning law: Here's the rule... and here are a million exceptions that tears it apart and feed it to the dogs.
     

    Old Novice

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    :p

    Learning English is almost exactly like learning law: Here's the rule... and here are a million exceptions that tears it apart and feed it to the dogs.

    I'd never defend the notion that it's easy to learn English, nor that the rules are always followed. :) But I nonetheless have a personal interest in the rules, and here I'm just trying to learn another of them. Do you know anything about an exception that would make Churchill's statement not truly responsive?
     

    duckie

    Senior Member
    Denmark
    Actually, I've never seen a good reason for that rule in the first place. English becomes very stuffy and unnatural if you put 'whom' and 'which' everywhere. It's just not a useful rule in the first place (unlike many of the other rules that are useful as long as all the exceptions are understood).
     

    duckie

    Senior Member
    Denmark
    I'd like to know how a learner can know if it sounds forced or not! up with which I will not put sounds like it's spoken by Yoda!! :)

    First off, we should all aspire to sound like Yoda!

    As for learning whether something sounds forced, that's simply a process when learning a language.
     

    duckie

    Senior Member
    Denmark
    Yes, it's is a general rule that most educated Engish speakers learn to use. "Don't end a sentence with a preposition." I try to follow this rule very carefully when I'm writing essay, and much less so when I'm speaking. If I'm writing a paper I wouldn't say:
    "The scientists have to find a species to experiment to experiment with," but rather: "The scientists must find a species with which to experiment"

    Your essays must be absolutely full of 'which' and 'whom'.
     

    HistofEng

    Senior Member
    USA Eng, Haitian-Creole
    Your essays must be absolutely full of 'which' and 'whom'.

    Not really! Usually, alot of prepositional phrases can be replaced by other words. A paper full of "whom" and "which" is just as bad as one filled with dangling prepositions, á mon avis. But if a sentence requires "which" or "whom," I will certainly include it.
     
    Top