poor hopeless

< Previous | Next >

rafanadal

Senior Member
Italian
Hi there, wonder if you can help me. I've been struggling to find a very informal word to describe a sport figure, tennis or soccer or whatever, who, although performing at high level, hasn't really got what it takes.

Something kind of like "duffer" for a golfer. But I suspect duffer means VERY poor, not even competing at high level.

You know, it happens all the time in ordinary conversation with buddies to say something like "Messi is good but XYZ is......:confused:


I checked urban dictionary but I found words I'm not completely happy with, such as "hacker" "clunker" "scrub" "bum" "bust". Maybe "no-good", but would you say "Messi is good but XYZ is a no-good"? hmmm...or "loser" perhaps? What about "lousy"?


Thinking about it I see I've collected many but...still not happy. Is there a very common adjective or noun to define someone that you think sucks in a game? Are any of the above words I mentioned used?
 
  • Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    The problem, Rafanadal, is that these informal words are used differently by different people, often depending on their regional and/or social background.

    The Urban Dictionary invites people to give thumbs-up and thumbs-down signs and the number of each points the differences I'm talking about.

    So it's hard for us to make helpful suggestions about this. You are best sticking to the Urban Dictionary, I think.
     

    rhitagawr

    Senior Member
    British English
    Words like no-good, hopeless, mean that the person is no good at all. This is not what rafandal wants to say.
    I've never heard of clunker. A hacker is someone who breaks into your computer, although in a footballing context I suppose it could mean a player who is always fouling people. Bum suggests moral turpitude. Bust means broken, at least to me. A loser is someone who has bad luck and never gets anywhere. All these words are far too strong and could mean different things to different people.
    You could say X is a second-tier player or a second-rank player. Or perhaps second-ranker if you want a single word. He's good, but he's not as good as the very best players.
     
    Last edited:

    rafanadal

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Thanks rhitagawr. I appreciate.
    I guess I have to turn the sentence around a bit, as I AM looking for a strong definition. Something in the range of "Messi rules but XYZ sucks" although it looks more like something written on a wall rather than some realistic sentence said among friends. :)

    Don't forget I'm talking street talk, pub or bar situation, not serious press, although even press may come down really hard on pro players.
    :D
     

    nato2101

    New Member
    English - Ireland
    I guess I have to turn the sentence around a bit, as I AM looking for a strong definition. Something in the range of "Messi rules but XYZ sucks" although it looks more like something written on a wall rather than some realistic sentence said among friends.
    I do some translation and scripting for Milan Channel, and use "leaves a lot to be desired" or "is not up to scratch" in such situations. However, it is not strong criticism. This season I've used both a fair bit to talk about Abbiati and the defence in general. I don't think there is a single, generally accepted, word that conveys what you are trying to say.

    edit: also "xyz is out of his depth" would work.
     

    rhitagawr

    Senior Member
    British English
    if you're talking over a pint, you can say X is rubbish/useless/hopeless, or even X is crap if you don't mind respectabe people thinking you're a peasnt.
     

    rafanadal

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Actually I started the post asking for "a word".
    I think I'll go for "dead loss" after all. I like it, tt sounds pretty all encompassing, it might be applied for people whom you don't think the world of, either sport figures, or musicians. Or whoever for that matter. At any level, I suppose.
    And it's not vulgar, though informal enough to put an end to my query, is it?.
    ;) ;)
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top