pop by for some fantastic stalls

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miss melancholy

Senior Member
Italian
una signora, commentando una casa-cottage che ha trovato sulla pagina "christmas vintage & craft fair" commenta così:

‎next saturday...pop by for some fantastic stalls xx


so che pop significa "scoppiare" ma cosa intende con "pop by" per alcune fantastiche bancarelle :confused: , forse un qualcosa di simile a "go nuts for"?
 
  • Leo57

    Senior Member
    UK English
    una signora, commentando una casa-cottage che ha trovato sulla pagina "christmas vintage & craft fair" commenta così:

    ‎next saturday...pop by for some fantastic stalls xx = come and look at the fantastic stalls..
    Hi there
    The meaning of to 'pop' (somewhere) is actually in the dictionary: http://www.wordreference.com/enit/pop

    A couple of examples:
    I'm just popping to the shops, I won't be a moment.
    While I'm out I'll pop over to Jean's to see if she is feeling any better. (or for any other reason!)
    It's a sort of quick impromptu visit somewhere.
    Ciao
    Leo:)
     

    miss melancholy

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Hi there
    The meaning of to 'pop' (somewhere) is actually in the dictionary: http://www.wordreference.com/enit/pop

    A couple of examples:
    I'm just popping to the shops, I won't be a moment.
    While I'm out I'll pop over to Jean's to see if she is feeling any better. (or for any other reason!)
    It's a sort of quick impromptu visit somewhere.
    Ciao
    Leo:)
    Hi:)
    "fare una salto" Is what we say in Rome when we want to "pop" by: "Va be' faccio un salto a casa tua" "I'll pop round to yours" (house)
    Got it now dear ones! :) Didn't know/see that even if searched for on the dict..
     

    k_georgiadis

    Senior Member
    English (AmE)
    I have been looking for a meaningful analogy; maybe this one: come to our party for a good time is the same as come to our party to have a good time.
     
    Last edited:

    gandolfo

    Senior Member
    English-British
    Just to add to KG's explanations:

    "Pop by to see some fantastic stalls","Pop by to see" etc etc

    "to" is with the infinitive and here means "in order to" something =purpose

    "Pop by for some fantastic stalls" =with the purpose of doing something: pop by for dinner,

    and yes they mean the same thing, they both indicate purpose.

    Really these types of questions you should ask on the English forum:)
     
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