Pop out for lunch

Luis.Olias

Senior Member
Spanish, Spain
Hello,

I am studying some English today and came across this sentence: "She's just popped out to the shop."

I was wondering if the following sentence could be also correct (I made it up this one) : "She just popped out for lunch."

Thanks in advance.
 
  • heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Yes. That's a perfectly good and idiomatic use of 'pop (out)'. I believe it's primarily, or even uniquely, a British English idiom. I don't think it's used in AE.
     

    Luis.Olias

    Senior Member
    Spanish, Spain
    heheh , good point, that helped to remember: "pop in, pop off..." , which I wasn't sure about, thanks!
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    It generally signifies a quick back and forth (or sometimes one-way) journey.

    He's popped out for lunch (he'll be back soon).

    He's popped in (and he'll go away soon).
    He's popped in (on impulse; he wasn't planning to).

    Pop-pop!
     

    spilorrific

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Luis,
    Hi...
    "Pop" is not used as often here (in the US) as in England or Australia, perhaps, but it is used.
    Examples:
    I'm just going to pop over to the pharmacy and pick up my prescription. ("Pop over" strikes me as sounding more BE than AE, now that I write it.) (I might say "zip"... I'm going to zip over to the pharmacy...or the ubiquitous "run" which may not actually (literally) include running...I'm going to run over to the pharmacy to pick up my prescription.)
    While we were in her neighborhood, we popped in to see Aunt Mary for a few minutes.
    Bob wasn't here long; he just popped in to say "hi."
    Tony isn't here right now; he popped out to run an errand but he'll return soon. (My husband says this sounds OK to him; I would say it sounds more BE than AE.)

    I would not dare speak for all Americans, but I occasionally use "pop" and use it most often with "in." People here (eastern US) would definitely know what you meant if you used it as Barque suggested.
     

    Luis.Olias

    Senior Member
    Spanish, Spain
    It generally signifies a quick back and forth (or sometimes one-way) journey.

    He's popped out for lunch (he'll be back soon).

    He's popped in (and he'll go away soon).
    He's popped in (on impulse; he wasn't planning to).

    Pop-pop!
    Really interesting, thanks!
     

    Luis.Olias

    Senior Member
    Spanish, Spain
    Luis,
    Hi...
    "Pop" is not used as often here (in the US) as in England or Australia, perhaps, but it is used.
    Examples:
    I'm just going to pop over to the pharmacy and pick up my prescription. ("Pop over" strikes me as sounding more BE than AE, now that I write it.) (I might say "zip"... I'm going to zip over to the pharmacy...or the ubiquitous "run" which may not actually (literally) include running...I'm going to run over to the pharmacy to pick up my prescription.)
    While we were in her neighborhood, we popped in to see Aunt Mary for a few minutes.
    Bob wasn't here long; he just popped in to say "hi."
    Tony isn't here right now; he popped out to run an errand but he'll return soon. (My husband says this sounds OK to him; I would say it sounds more BE than AE.)

    I would not dare speak for all Americans, but I occasionally use "pop" and use it most often with "in." People here (eastern US) would definitely know what you meant if you used it as Barque suggested.
    This is really informative!, thanks!
     

    Trochfa

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    If someone's busy you could say "[I'm] sorry to disturb you, I'll pop back later" or "I'll pop back in a few minutes", or whatever time period is appropriate to the situation.
     
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