Poplollies and Bellibones

cuchuflete

Senior Member
EEUU-inglés
Today I made the three mile trek into the village for provisions, and also visited the town dump. Feeling virtuous that I recycle nearly everything that said establishment will take, and because the sun has finally become visible after weeks of rain, I visited the Skidompha Library's used book store.

In the obscure and dusty language section I found a gem: Poplollies and
Bellibones, A Celebration of Lost Words
by Susan K. Sperling, with illustrations by George Moran, and a Foreword by that wonderful wordsmith, Willard Espy. ISBN 0-517-53079-1 Published by Clarkson N. Potter, 1977.

For less than the cost of a pack of cigarettes, or a pineapple if you prefer, I have something to share with you, from time to time. It's great fun!

Here's an entry, selected at random:

Fools have always been around for others' pleasure, but they are no longer designated by such lively names as fopdoodle, a word for an ordinary simpleton or fool. Fonkin was a diminutive, almost affectionat-sounding word for a little fool who possessed more charm perhaps than the silly fopdoodle. A hoddypeak was a stupid blockhead, as were the hoddy-noddy and the hoddypoll.

If you enjoy these snippets, say so and more will appear from time to time.

cheers,
Cuchuflete
 
  • jacinta

    Senior Member
    USA English
    I am definitely going to work "fopdoodle" into my daily vocabulary. Or possibly hoddypeaK is better. I can't decide!! I'll have to use both. Very fun words. Keep them coming!
     

    lsp

    Senior Member
    NY
    US, English
    More! More! :D :D You'll recognize me in every forum I join in the future if you see a someone with the username fonkin!
     

    Grammarian-in-Training

    New Member
    USA, English
    If there's a hoddypeak, and then there's a hoddy-noddy, is there also then a hoddy-poddy? If not, I coin that word. I'll be sure to call someone a hoddy-poddy in the next 24 hours. :)
     

    ojyram

    Senior Member
    USA English (Learning Spanish)
    Only a birdbrain, blockhead, bonehead, chump, dolt, donkey, dope, dork, dunderhead, dupe, lamebrain, loon, lunkhead, meathead, numskull, sap, schlemiel, turkey, twerp, or twit would not want more bellibones and poplollies!

    Please tell us now.... what is a poplolly? Is it the same as a lollypop?
     

    mjscott

    Senior Member
    American English
    Well, ojyram, I think Qxu isn't going to be a hoddynoddy--he'll dole out the poplollies and bellibones in small increments so that our vocabularies will expand gradually!
     

    LadyBlakeney

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Mr. Cuchu, thanks for sharing that pearl with us, you're so kind!!!

    Please, use the same thread every time so that we don't miss any of the precious installments. :D
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    What a delight to find others who smile at this discovery....

    Here's one more, also selected at random, before the sun comes up today.

    Whistersnefet
    What on Earth is it?
    A whistersnefet is a blow or buffet, like a slap on the ear. Whistersnefets are a source of adlubescence for masochists.
     

    mjscott

    Senior Member
    American English
    cuchuflete said:
    What a delight to find others who smile at this discovery....

    Here's one more, also selected at random, before the sun comes up today.

    Whistersnefet What on Earth is it?

    Sounded like whistersnefets could have been prolific with with the Three Stooges. Looking up their adlubescence (or the adlubescence of those who enjoy the Three Stooges), I came upon this:

    http://www.spizzquiz.net/index.html

    I'm thinking that if they were adlubescent, it was for hitting the other guy--not for hitting themselves.

    I'm guessing the verb to express the action of either getting or receiving the whisternefet would be whistersneffting. The administrator of the whistersnefet would be the whistersnefeter, and the receiver of such action would be the whistersnefetee.
     

    te gato

    Senior Member
    Alberta--TGE (te gato English)
    Ahhh..Cuchu KIA;

    Please do continue..do not make us merry-go-sorry..for we all have an aeipathy for your much loved postings..and if you do not..we will all be full of amarlence..
    so please make us bonifate..and grant us a brabeum...

    tg
     

    te gato

    Senior Member
    Alberta--TGE (te gato English)
    mjscott said:
    Are these words Albertan, or te_gatalán?
    Hey mj;
    Oh I so wish I could take credit for them...(sigh)..but...I can not...

    They are forgotten words.....like Cuchu's...

    and I'm not going to tell you what they mean..(nah..nah)..you have to figure them out all by yourself...:D

    the oh so hard to forget..forgotten tg...
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    The hardhewer graffed for stone for a knosp.
    Foir the door to his cosh, upsy-English with burl;
    He theeked it with thatch and stood back to
    aimcry,
    Then shrieked, "Juvament! Hadivist! No eyethurl!"

    Gather round, my darling mugwumps, and I'll tell you what the little book has to say about all these matters.

    Hardhewer is a stonemason, and graffed means dug. A knosp, as you doubtlessly guessed, is naught but an architerctural ornament. It's shaped like a flower bud or a knob. A cosh is your average small cottage, and this one is in the manner of the English or English- style...upsy-English.

    Still with me you fine curmudgeons in training...? Theeked is thatched, or covered the roof with protective straw, which also invites mice to nest. To aimcry is to approve or admire, and a cry for Juvament simply means "Help!!"

    When you need an expression of regret, for making one of your rare mistakes, you cry out Hadivist!. According to Sperling, it is "a pang of remorse for having done something in ignorance, as if to say, 'If I had only known!' or 'I wish I had thought of it before!'"

    The eyethurl is the window.

    If this sounds like Benjois to you, just imagine Benjy's ancestors speaking it.

    Un abrazo,
    Cuchu
     

    la grive solitaire

    Senior Member
    United States, English
    cuchuflete said:
    A knosp, as you doubtlessly guessed, is naught but an architerctural ornament. It's shaped like a flower bud or a knob.
    lol--Delightful! Here's "knosp" in (surprisingly) an early 20th-century poem:

    1 I saw a Melancholy Wasp
    2 Upon a Purple Clover Knosp,
    3 Who wept, "The Poets do me Wrong,
    4 Excluding me from Noble Song --
    5 Though Pure am I and Wholly Crimeless --
    6 Because, they say, my Name is Rhymeless!
    7 Oh, had I but been born a Bee,
    8 With Heaps of Words to Rhyme with me,
    9 I should not want for Panegyrics
    10 In Sonnets, Epics, Odes and Lyrics!
    11 Will no one free me from the Curse
    12 That bars my Race from Lofty Verse?"
    13 "My Friend, that Little Thing I'll care for
    14 At once," said I -- and that is wherefore
    15 So tenderly I set that Wasp
    16 Upon a Purple Clover Knosp.

    http://eir.library.utoronto.ca/rpo/display/poem3079.html
     

    zebedee

    Senior Member
    Gt. Britain - English
    Ah, so a knosp can be a real flowerbud as well as an architectural accoutrement. Fascinating, thanks for the cute poem, la grive. Not sure I agree with a wasp being Pure and wholly Crimeless though...

    Can't wait for the next installment QChu. Are you going to enlighten us as to what bellibones are? I presume Poplollies are the same as their counterparts.
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    zebedee said:
    Ah, so a knosp can be a real flowerbud as well as an architectural accoutrement. Fascinating, thanks for the cute poem, la grive. Not sure I agree with a wasp being Pure and wholly Crimeless though...

    Can't wait for the next installment QChu. Are you going to enlighten us as to what bellibones are? I presume Poplollies are the same as their counterparts.

    I have yet to read that far, Estimada Zeb, but since you asked so nicely...
    as befits a bellibones (a lovely lady, a pretty lass" from the French belle et bonne, I'll try to hunt it up.


    Gracious, it's another synonym for a Zebedee!
    :)

    Poplolly
    :
    A little darling (from the French Poupelet), a female favorite, special loved one, or mistress.


    c.
     

    ojyram

    Senior Member
    USA English (Learning Spanish)
    Thanks for the delightful tale of the knosp!

    Here's my all time favorite:
    # Jabberwocky - written by Lewis Carroll
    Read 3728 times on PoetryConnection.net.

    'Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
    did gyre and gimble in the wabe.
    All mimsy were the borogoves,
    And the mome raths outgrabe.

    When there is no rhyming word, Dorothy Aldis simply created one,
    as in this poem that I memorized many, many years ago as a child.

    Eletelephony by Dorothy Aldis
    Once there was an elephant
    Who tried to use the telephant.
    Oh, no! I mean an elephone
    Who tried to use a telephone.
    Dear me, I fancy quite,
    That even now it isn't right
    How'ere it was, he got his trunk
    Entangled in the elephunk.
    The more he tried to get it free
    The louder buzzed the telephee.
    I fear I'd better drop this song
    of elehop and telephong.
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    Thanks Ojyram...brings back childhood memories of elehops and telphongs.

    Let's see who can translate this:
    Glop the bellytimber, givel the plate,
    Let the reelpot pass the jubbe.
    Let vasquines paggle and contours dumple,
    'Tis not melpomenish, nor worth the
    Whoopubb
    .

    cheers,
    cuchu
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    It must be the day of rest... No takers so far.

    Well, here's another, with a definition:

    "He's out glopping his bellytimber."

    Glopping=swallowing greedily
    Bellytimber=food, provisions

    That reminds me...time for a repast. Buen provecho.
    c.
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    Well, we have had about 6 months to digest the bellytimber, so I suppose it's time for another course.

    "Having proved himself on the battlefield, Tenderis's heart quopped with the thrill of meeting a different sort of challenge. He vowed to rixle over the affections of the latest bellibone to catch his fancy, fairheaded Pretty Pure Polly Esther. He had yarkened a picnic for them to share in a picturesque spot just a wurp away from a brooling brook, where Tenderis grandly unfolded the sanap for their lunch."

    Sperling, op. cit.
     

    stargazer

    Senior Member
    Slovenia, Slovenian
    Hi, I've just logged in and found all those lovely words!! Do keep them coming, please! I wonder why they came out of use :confused: Does the book say anything about their origin, or how old they are?
     
    cuchuflete said:
    Well, we have had about 6 months to digest the bellytimber, so I suppose it's time for another course.


    Tenderis grandly unfolded the sanap for their lunch."




    Sperling, op. cit.





    As an English person I find the word 'sanap' very interesting as it is still in usage (but to a lessening degree) as 'snap', which is a packed lunch made up by wives for their toiling husbands. I believe it is more widely used in the north of England and vaguely recall it was commonplace in the coal mining communities, but I'll have to check.

    Brill words to give us Cuchu. Look forward to more.:D

    Edit: Listed in a dictionary of slang as 'a packed lunch - midlands and north England dialect.' A typical coal miner's day (long ago) is described here
    http://www.btinternet.com/~aldridgelhs/COAL.htm
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    LRV said:
    Brill words to give us


    "Brill is a fictional female elf character from the comic book series Elfquest..."

    Brill: a European flatfish.

    I yield to the lady with the sceptre. What be 'brill'?

    Might it be this?
    adjective, exclamation
    UK INFORMAL FOR brilliant (VERY GOOD):
    You should buy this CD - it's brill!


    More confusion from our friends at Opcit:

    Sanap. From the Old French sauvenape 'save the nape' (tablecloth). This particular strip of cloth was placed over the outer edges of the tablecloth to keep it from being soiled.
    Hence, I infer that toiling husbands eat strips of linen for their mid day meal in parts of the UK.
     
    cuchu Sir,

    If you had read my link to a day in the life of a coal miner, you would have seen that the 'snap' was 'wrapped in newspaper to keep the mice out' - very fanciful since rodents love nothing more than a good old chew on newspaper to make new nests for their ever growing families.

    However, this was definitely 'sauving the nappe', which probably only saw the light of day at Sunday tea.

    LRV
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    Your Majesty,

    Reaching under my penistone coverslut to withdraw the muckender, which I shall hoist and wave in surrender...

    May your Ma'amship accept my liripoop with all intended respect,

    Your breedbate.
    C
    uchuflete


    hmmmm...how do those royals know so much about mouse breeding, he wondered.
     

    ojyram

    Senior Member
    USA English (Learning Spanish)
    I am amazed at you all.... that this thread is continuing after all these months. I can hardly keep up with all the new words I encounter that ARE in common use. How amazing that your brains can hold all these words, too!
     

    cirrus

    Senior Member
    UK English
    cuchuflete said:
    Reaching under my penistone coverslut to withdraw the muckender, which I shall hoist and wave in surrender...
    Cuchuflete

    Penistone is a village not twelve miles away from where I come from. It is exactly the sort of place where you'd call your butties snap, or scran for that matter. Coverslut I shall cherish. The word will keep me warm against the delights of my (oh so willing!) return to work today.
     

    television

    New Member
    English - US
    What a fun thread. In response to the lead post:

    "Fonkin" probably comes from the Middle English "fonke" which means "a spark of fire" or figuratively "something worthless or contemptible".
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    Translation time.
    Reaching under my penistone[coarse woolen cloth wooven in the town of Penistone] coverslut[an apron] to withdraw the muckender,[bib or handkerchief] which I shall hoist and wave in surrender...

    May your Ma'amship accept my liripoop[tail hanging from a graduate's hood, like a tassel on a mortarboard] with all intended respect,

    Your breedbate.[mischief-maker]

    The above provided that you may avoid misglozing.
     

    television

    New Member
    English - US
    ME knappe:

    (a) An ornamental knob on a cup, a dish or its cover; (b) a small projection on a surgical instrument; (c) a bunch or tuft on a shoe, cap, garment, armor, etc.; ?also, a tassel, a button, a clasp or fastener; (d) ?an embossed ornament on or under a roof [cp. knotte in rof]; (e) a knot or protuberance on a tree or plant; a bud, rosebud; also, a rose hip; (f) a joint in the stalk of a plant; (g) a testicle.
     

    television

    New Member
    English - US
    I have a friend who lives in Penistone. It's a town near Sheffield about forty-five miles south of here.

    I have a feeling there are plenty of coversluts there, too.
     
    cuchuflete said:
    Translation time.

    The above provided that you may avoid misglozing.

    What strange misconceptions we have when trying to figure out the meaning of a new word.

    'muckender' (thinks.........a tool used by rustic stable-lads when 'mucking out' the stables).

    'liripoop' (that which one has in a public convenience in Italy).

    'coverslut' (a whore's dress).

    La Reine :)
     

    Hakro

    Senior Member
    Finnish - Finland
    la reine victoria said:
    As an English person I find the word 'sanap' very interesting as it is still in usage (but to a lessening degree) as 'snap', which is a packed lunch made up by wives for their toiling husbands. [/left]
    You are probably right as you know English better than I do, but 'sanap' gives me an idea of the Swedish word 'senap' that means mustard. I think that mustard could also be an alternative for lunch, couldn't it?
     

    maxiogee

    Banned
    English
    You ask if we should like more - may I capitalise my response and shout "YES - most decidedly". Should you wish to start a thread and post a word a day I would be a regular visitor.
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    maxiogee said:
    You ask if we should like more - may I capitalise my response and shout "YES - most decidedly". Should you wish to start a thread and post a word a day I would be a regular visitor.
    Thanks for that encouragement Maxiogee. If I can overcome my looming deadlines--catching up to me rapidly from the past--and general lassitude and sloth, I'll post some more soon.

    Please add others of your own finding and preference. These are lots of fun.


    Un saludo,
    Cuchu


    Have I mentioned bartholomew-pig? Our source tells us that

    "A person who ate too much bartholomew-pig paid for his excesses at a local spittle."
     

    maxiogee

    Banned
    English
    I presume the bartholomew-pig to be something associated with St Bartholomew's Day, and the spittle to be a corruption of Hospital, as in the London (England) district of Spitalfields, which owes its name to a Hugenot hospital which was there.
     

    cirrus

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Nice idea but it's way too neat for me.

    I found this on the net. "BARTHOLOMEW PIG- A term used by Shakespeare to refer to very fat people, these people resembling the whole roast pigs served on St. Bartholomew's festival. The festival was celebrated on August 24 from 1133 to 1855. The symbol for St. Bartholomew was the knife, alluding to the one used to flay him alive in Armenia in AD 44." Source
     
    cirrus said:
    Nice idea but it's way too neat for me.

    I found this on the net. "BARTHOLOMEW PIG- A term used by Shakespeare to refer to very fat people, these people resembling the whole roast pigs served on St. Bartholomew's festival. The festival was celebrated on August 24 from 1133 to 1855. The symbol for St. Bartholomew was the knife, alluding to the one used to flay him alive in Armenia in AD 44." Source

    Nice one Cirrus, me old china,

    What a horrible end for St. Bartholomew! I have always associated flaying with whipping, but I see it can simply mean 'to strip the skin off'.
    Yuk! :eek:

    Regards,

    LRV
     
    Hakro said:
    You are probably right as you know English better than I do, but 'sanap' gives me an idea of the Swedish word 'senap' that means mustard. I think that mustard could also be an alternative for lunch, couldn't it?


    No, Hakro! It would make a low-calorie but HOT and very unpleasant lunch.

    Mustard is what you put on your meat if you are having a sandwich for lunch. An English favourite is roast beef and mustard.

    Come to my sandwich bar when you sail into Cowes, I'll give you one on the house. :D

    Hali!
    La Reine V
     

    Hakro

    Senior Member
    Finnish - Finland
    la reine victoria said:
    No, Hakro! It would make a low-calorie but HOT and very unpleasant lunch.

    Mustard is what you put on your meat if you are having a sandwich for lunch. An English favourite is roast beef and mustard.

    Come to my sandwich bar when you sail into Cowes, I'll give you one on the house. :D

    Hali!
    La Reine V
    A hot lunch could be quite pleasant on a cold winter day like today.

    I have a sandwich deck in my boat but I don't use mustard on it. Anyway, I'll try it in your sandwich bar.

    Hali, too!
    Hakro
     
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