Population-Average, Landmark- and Surface-based (PALS) atlas of human cerebral cortex (Neuroscience)

NewAmerica

Senior Member
Mandarin
Does "landmark" here mean "important step/unprecedented development"?

But if so, how could you know your own paper is "important" before being replicated or verified/falsified by others?

What is more, the paper says "The specific PALS-B12 atlas introduced here is derived from structural MRI volumes of 12 normal young adults." Only 12 subjects! Such small sample size normally gives readers no impression of being "landmark"(Okay, here it simply involves grammar - for English learning only).


Thanks in advance

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A Population-Average, Landmark- and Surface-based (PALS) atlas of human cerebral cortex.

This report describes a new electronic atlas of human cerebral cortex that provides a substrate for a wide variety of brain-mapping analyses. The Population-Average, Landmark- and Surface-based (PALS) atlas approach involves surface-based and volume-based representations of cortical shape, each available as population averages and as individual subject data. The specific PALS-B12 atlas introduced here is derived from structural MRI volumes of 12 normal young adults.

by: David C. Van Essen

Source
 
  • JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    No. It is using the first definition in the WRF entry for the definition of landmark. (You must have missed it when you searched!) landmark - WordReference.com Dictionary of English

    1. a feature in the landscape or an object in an area that is easily noticed or that serves as a guide, as to ships at sea or to travelers on a road:The tower is a local landmark.
    It was also used in the paper you "challenged" here. Figure 1 of that paper has pictures of things they refer to as landmarks.

    For example, landmark-based SBR to the PALS atlas achieves superior results when compared to affine or LDN VBR in aligning cortical sulci throughout each hemisphere (Van Essen, 2005).
    Note that the hyphen after landscape indicates that it means landscape-based and surface-based; in such situations the first instance of the word after the hyphen can be omitted.
     
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    NewAmerica

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    :thumbsup:

    You have a tremendous linguistic advantage because English is your first language. I read the papers much slower but I will continue that thread anyways. :idea:
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    :thumbsup:

    You have a tremendous linguistic advantage because English is your first language. I read the papers much slower but I will continue that thread anyways. :idea:
    More than 40 years and 50 publications in my career after my PhD in biochemistry, biophysics and biotechnology help too - many native speakers outside such a background would be having trouble similar to yours (a lot of such phraseology and terminology is like a foreign language to them too!)- so it's not simply an English language advantage. :) In any case, the review process makes it really quite unlikely that many English language errors appear in good peer-reviewed papers, so many of the issues will be related to familiarity with the field. How much science training have you received - you are digging deep!
     
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