por parte del mencionado cabo, un clase y el infante de Marina

Heredianista

Senior Member
English - USA
I can't figure out what "cabo, un clase" means here. (The full paragraph is attached as a screenshot.) Many thanks in advance!

"...fuimos sometidos a castigos corporales y torturas por parte del mencionado cabo, un clase y el infante de Marina."

"...we were subjected to corporal punishment and torture by the above-mentioned _______, and the marine."
 

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  • Bevj

    Allegra Moderata (Sp/Eng, Cat)
    English (U.K.)
    Cabo, un clase appears to me to be two people. 1) Cabo - a corporal; 2) un clase - another rank, which I have no idea how to translate.
     

    voltape

    Senior Member
    Peruvian Spanish/USA English
    Más de mil jóvenes se graduaron como "clases" del Ejército
    Es la promoción más numerosa que ha egresado desde la Escuela de Suboficiales del Ejército en Rinconada de Maipú. El ministro de Defensa valoró el aporte en los tiempos de guerra y paz de la institución. I just found it . It is a sort of minor officer - If no great accuracy is required, I'd put "a minor officer"
     
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    Heredianista

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    Goodness, voltape, that's a great find!

    I'm not sure that "minor officer" means anything in English, though.

    However, you are saying that, in this case, it refers to a person in the army, so at least I know the branch of the armed forces in question. I wish I knew military terminology in English, but I really don't. I doubt "minor army officer" means anything, either.

    I don't see anything about "clases" here, either:
    Military ranks of Ecuador - Wikipedia
     

    Quirce

    Senior Member
    Spanish-Madrid
    Se me ocurre que puede equivaler a un "private first class" o, mejor, a un "sergeant first class" del ejército americano. Algo entre "staff sergeant" y "master sergeant".
    En España también hay "soldados de primera clase", pero no parece que se adapte bien a le que dice voltape. Y en todo caso se abrevia como "soldado primera", no como "clase".
     

    Heredianista

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    Se me ocurre que puede equivaler a un "private first class" o, mejor, a un "sergeant first class" del ejército americano. Algo entre "staff sergeant" y "master sergeant".
    En España también hay "soldados de primera clase", pero no parece que se adapte bien a le que dice voltape. Y en todo caso se abrevia como "soldado primera", no como "clase".

    Thank you, Quirce.

    I'm still confused, as these are four different terms. And sergeants are non-commissioned officers, but privates aren't officers at all.

    And voltape has suggested "a minor officer".
     

    jsvillar

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Spain
    Checking the link from Voltape, it says that more than 1000 young corporals graduated in the NCO Academy (in Spanish suboficiales) as 'clases'. So a clase is the lowest ranking of an NCO, and you become one being a corporal and then going to the academy.
     

    pacoxver

    Member
    Colombian Spanish
    According to what voltape presents, it will be fine to leave it like private since it fits regarding the context:

    "...we were subjected to corporal punishment and torture by the above-mentioned, a private, and the marine."
     

    Heredianista

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    According to what voltape presents, it will be fine to leave it like private since it fits regarding the context:

    "...we were subjected to corporal punishment and torture by the above-mentioned, a private, and the marine."

    Thank you, pacoxver; that's good to know. There doesn't seem to be a "private" among the ranks of the U.S. Navy, but again, the marines are part of the navy in Ecuador.

    At the moment I have translated it as "a non-commissioned army officer", but perhaps "private" is better.
     

    Heredianista

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    Why 'army'? The example I found was about the army, but it seems a generic word as NCO. Maybe he was an NCO from the Navy or even from the Police, in some countries they are a military corps.

    jsvillar, you are absolutely right. I had actually changed it to "non-commissioned officer [or private]", because I realized the same thing.

    Thank you!
     
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