portare

AlexanderBB

Member
Italian
Hi to everyone,
I'm Alex, from Italy, and i'm trying to learn English. ('cause it's a beautiful and attractive language)
I've just begun 1 month ago, and in this time i've watched some movies and i've read two books.
Obviously i've got many trouble through this trip!

I've got a question: the italian verb "portare" have many translation in english, like Bring, bear, take... Could anyone help me to understand the differences between this verbs?

And i will be really happy if someone corret me what i've written above!

One thousand of thanks!
Alex
 
  • MonsieurAquilone

    Senior Member
    NZ - English
    It is quite hard for me to show the difference between each one as I will use the verbs you have mentioned in describing them!

    In sentences:

    I will bring the sandwiches to the picnic.
    The tree will bear a lot of fruit.
    He will take the rug to/for the picnic.
     

    AlexanderBB

    Member
    Italian
    Thanks for help!

    There is specific use for these verbs...
    I mean: what is the correct verb for:
    PORTARE something to someone
    PORTARE something to another place
    PORTARE a feelings (like love, hate...) vs someone

    Is what i wrote in this post and in the post above correct?
    I've got the doubt that what i've written is awful!!!

    thanks a lot
     

    MonsieurAquilone

    Senior Member
    NZ - English
    AlexanderBB said:
    Hi to everyone,
    I'm Alex, from Italy, and i'm trying to learn English. ('cause it's a beautiful and attractive language)
    I've just begun 1 month ago, and in this time i've watched some movies and i've read two books.
    Obviously i've (made mistakes?) while I have been learning!

    I've got a question: the italian verb "portare" has many translations in english, like Bring, bear, take... Could anyone help me to understand the differences between these verbs?

    And i will be really happy if someone could correct me with what i've written above!

    One thousand of thanks! - Many thanks
    Alex
    You have not made too many msitakes.
     

    MonsieurAquilone

    Senior Member
    NZ - English
    AlexanderBB said:
    Thanks for help!

    There is specific use for these verbs...
    I mean: what is the correct verb for:
    PORTARE something to someone
    PORTARE something to another place
    PORTARE feelings (like love, hate...) vs someone
    Portare 1: something to someone = bring (I brought her the book that she wanted)
    Portare 2: something to somewhere = take/bring (I took the 'aquilone' (my most favourite word) to the beach)/ (I brought the umbrella to the beach.
    Portare 3: I am not sure. Sorry
     

    AlonYo

    Member
    English / USA
    Hello. Here's my go, to augment on MonsieurAquilone:

    something to someone, "bring"

    something/someone to somewhere: "take" if it's "there", "bring" if it's "here" (I will take the book there. I will bring the newspaper here.) You can use "bring" for there as well (I will bring the book there.) but to me it doesn't seem like you can use it for "here" (WRONG - I will take the book here.)

    "carry" can substitute for both "bring" and "take" if it's the idea of bringing an object of substantial weight (both physically and figuratively). (I carried the books to the library, I carry the weight of all my sins with me, etc.)

    clothing: "wear", (I wear the shirt.)

    heavy weight/emotions: bear (I can bear the weight of the car, I can't bear all the sadness.) - In English this is fine, but I am not sure if you can use "portare" for this in Italian, you'll have to let me know.

    for emotions, I think "feel" might be good for all emotions, in the sense that you constantly hold it with you. (I feel happiness, I feel sadness). For hatred, there are many: "nurture" (I nurture hatred deep in my soul.) You can even say "hold" I would say, but it might sound a little bit more weird; it sounds better with qualifiers, like some adjectives. (I hold such a deep hatred for him.)

    Sorry for all the hatred.
    Hope it helps!
     

    TimLA

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    AlexanderBB said:
    Thanks for your help!

    Is there a specific use for these verbs?
    I mean: what is the correct verb for:
    PORTARE something to someone
    PORTARE something to another place
    PORTARE feelings (like love, hate...) vs someone

    Is what I wrote in this post and in the post above correct?
    I have got the doubts that what I've written is awful!!!

    Thanks a lot
    You are doing fine. There are minor corrections.

    The "Word Reference" dictionary gives 12 definitions of portare in English. All of them are obviously used correctly in English, but I would recommend you just focus on one of them, then later, start adding other meanings. I'll give you examples for "carry".

    I carry the book to the library.
    He carries a book from his house to Joe's house.
    I will carry the computer to school.
    He will carry the baggage to the hotel.
    I carried the sack of cement to Larry's house.
    He carried the CD's from Mary's house to Clara's house.

    The use of "carry" above, in my mind, is the physical act of having something in your hands and moving it from one place (person) to another place (person).

    Bring can be used exactly the same way. I have constructed the sentences above so that you can replace "carry" with "bring" and have a very similar meaning. But "bring" is more general. You don't have to carry something to bring it. Example:

    I will carry the computer to school. (A physical act with the computer in my hands)
    I will bring the computer to school. (The computer is in my car, but I didn't carry it in my hands).

    Take can be used similarly. The sentences above have been written so that you can replace carry with take. In my mind, take is similar to bring, but "bring" often means movement to the person talking. "Take" often means movement away from the person talking (not always).

    In Italian, you don't have that problem.

    Io porto il libro alla biblioteca. (un azione fisica)
    Lei porterà il baggalio al albergo. (in macchina, non per le mani)
    Mi ha portato al albergo San Carlo. (in macchina)

    English can be difficult sometimes...continue reading and writing every word you can...:D
     

    AlexanderBB

    Member
    Italian
    @ TimLA
    I really appreciate your post... actually usefull.

    When i've seen LA in your profile, a song come to my mind... When the hills of Los Angeles are burning, by Bad Religion. In that song there's a sentence that i can't understand:
    EN "Even the stars are ill at ease"
    IT "Anche/persino le stelle sono...?"
    anyway, thanks so much!

    @
    thanks so much Hillibilly!
    Hai is better.
    Hai (you have .. informal... friendly)
    Ha (you have formal or he has)

    thanks to all. I'm glad to see that there are fabulous people around the world!
     

    Jana337

    Senior Member
    čeština
    AlexanderBB said:
    @ TimLA
    I really appreciate your post... actually usefull useful.

    When i've seen LA in your profile, a song come to my mind... When the hills of Los Angeles are burning, by Bad Religion. In that song there's a sentence thati can't understand:
    EN "Even the stars are ill at ease"
    IT "Anche/persino le stelle sono...?"
    anyway, thanks so much!
    Ciao e benvenuto! :)

    Some boring stuff:

    Please do not go off topic. If you have a new question, you have to open a new thread.

    Also, pay attention to proper capitalization.

    Choose informative titles for your threads. Our dictionary links to them. I am going to change the title chosen by you to "portare", and whenever someone looks up portare in the future, this thread will be offered as a reference.

    Here are the rules; you might want to spend a couple of minutes reading them. :)

    Jana
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top