...positive aspects of mobiles, of which there are many

patrick combe

Member
Spain and Spanish
Hi there!
I'm not 100% confident that the preposition in the sentence below is correct:

"People often focus on the negative aspects of mobiles and forget about the positive ones, of which there are many."

Don't you think that the sentence could be rephrased differently in a more accurately way?

... the positive ones, which they have many.
... the positive ones, which there are many of.

Thank you in advance.
Patrick
 
  • patrick combe

    Member
    Spain and Spanish
    Which first sentence do you mean, Rover? The model sentence in inverted commas or the first of the two options I was suggesting.

    Thanks for your reply
     

    lunatiqfrinj

    Senior Member
    British English
    "People often focus on the negative aspects of mobiles and forget about the positive ones, of which there are many."
    Fine. Great, Perfect way of saying it. Very natural and native sounding


    "People often focus on the negative aspects of mobiles and forget about the positive ones, which they have many."
    Confusion: they == the people, the mobiles, or the aspects? Don't use this form (it doesnt actually make sense)

    "People often focus on the negative aspects of mobiles and forget about the positive ones, which there are many of."
    My good sir, at Harvard we do not end a sentence with a preposition!
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    The original sentence is clear and natural.

    The first suggested alternative is incomplete and sounds dreadful.

    The second is OK (I have no theological objections to ending a sentence with a preposition) but it is inelegant and indeed clumsy
     
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