Possessive - s' or s's with proper nouns - Chris' or Chris's dog?

dalanw

New Member
English - US
Do you mean "common" as opposed to formal or as in correct?

I'm certainly all for friendly disagreement. Just relating experience--technically not preconception, eh?
 
  • dojibear

    Senior Member
    US English
    In written English I might see "Chris' dog" or I might see "Chris's dog".

    But in spoken English I would pronounce those 2 phrases the same: "Krɪs-es dɔg", with two separate S sounds.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    In written English I might see "Chris' dog" or I might see "Chris's dog".

    But in spoken English I would pronounce those 2 phrases the same: "Krɪs-es dɔg", with two separate S sounds.
    Me too. As I'm sure I've said before, either in this thread or other related ones....
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Interesting variation on the theme. We have not discussed names ending X very much in this thread. Today's Guardian has an interesting take on the plural and possessive plural.
    Those close to the Sussexes say Meghan will be devastated that there were people who felt that in her orbit.
    This is a simple pluralization of Sussex.
    The Sussex’s lawyers have denied the bullying allegations, painting them as a smear campaign by staff.
    This is the "variant" that I've not seen before. The example is not an isolated case but is used at least twice, so unlikely to have been done without thought or editorial approval. I would have written Sussexes'.

    From 'Nobody wins': should palace fear Harry and Meghan's interview?
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    rushing off to patent the idea
    You're several decades too late. Computers have been using virtual Tipp-Ex for donkeys' years -- ever since they were equipped with keyboards. For trademark reasons, however, the name Tipp-Ex cannot be used for this feature. We just call it the Delete Key now.
     

    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    American English (New England and NYC)
    On the other hand, if the Guardian editors really wish to live down to their reputation -- and further -- they'd use the time-honored physical Tipp-Ex.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    You're several decades too late. Computers have been using virtual Tipp-Ex for donkeys' years -- ever since they were equipped with keyboards. For trademark reasons, however, the name Tipp-Ex cannot be used for this feature. We just call it the Delete Key now.
    Thank you for you insight :D
    The idea was to use a device that is applied to the computer screen, not a virtual equivalent - it involves a screen and pen device that can distinguish between something intended to perform action X (deleting a letter or more) and action B (changing letters to bold) and action I (changing to italic) :) It's very unobvious and clearly patentable :eek: All based on the notion that writing, reviewing and editing etc are done on screens not on paper. (I've not worked in a newspaper office, let alone in a pandemic, so I don't know how much paper they use these days)
     
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