Possible & Plossible [plausible]

< Previous | Next >

djburner

New Member
Costa Rica Spanish
Hi everyone, since some time ago I've noticed that some American speakers use "pLossible" instead of possible. I Know that both terms mean the same thing, but, Why do they pronounce that T?, Its an American term (Since I've heard it in TV shows like "Mythbusters" -pretty often btw-. Or is it an accepted English word?, at less in urban terms.


Thanks for any hint on this matter.
 
Last edited:
  • djburner

    New Member
    Costa Rica Spanish
    Thanks DearPrudence, that's it, I’ve always thought that Plausible means just something worthy of applause, but going deeper in the dictionary It says that Plausible also means something appearing worthy of belief <the argument was both powerful and plausible>, so that's it.

    Many thanks for your help
     

    sound shift

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Thanks DearPrudence, that's it, I’ve always thought that Plausible means just something worthy of applause, but going deeper in the dictionary It says that Plausible also means something appearing worthy of belief <the argument was both powerful and plausible>, so that's it.

    Many thanks for your help
    My home dictionary states that "plausible" derives from Latin plausibilis and that the latter means "worthy of applause". However, I think there must have been a change of meaning over the years, because I have never heard "plausible" used with the meaning "worthy of applause". Neither the WR dictionary nor my home dictionary gives "worthy of applause" as a current meaning of "plausible".
     

    Lis48

    Senior Member
    English - British
    I´ve never heard plossible but wondered if you could you have heard prossible/ prossibly? That seems to have become popular in films as meaning a bit more than possible but not probable. My kids use it a lot!
    Just a thought.
     

    djburner

    New Member
    Costa Rica Spanish
    Hi Lis48, actually that is the word: Plausible. But It's little curious how easy I got confused with this word: Plausible in Spanish (my mother language) means “Worthy of applause” (and It's spelled exactly the same way -P.l.a.u.s.i.b.l.e-) and we use it almost just under this meaning: "Something worthy of applause". That was why I always thought that Plausible in English has the same meaning that is has in Spanish

    And looking for its etymology on Latin (pretty well pointed out by sound shift), and according with the Merrian Webter it means:



    • Plau·si·ble
    • Pronunciation: \plȯ-zə-bəl\
    • Function: adjective
    • Etymology: Latin plausibilis worthy of applause, from plausus, past participle of plaudere
    • Date: 1565
    1 : superficially fair, reasonable, or valuable but often specious <a plausible pretext>
    2 : superficially pleasing or persuasive <a swindler… , then a quack, then a smooth, plausible gentleman — R. W. Emerson>
    3 : appearing worthy of belief <the argument was both powerful and plausible>


    Therefore it seems like “Plausible” is totally unusual to be use as an adjective for "something worthy of applause" even though its etymology.
    Eg. His last book was totally plausible (His last book was excellent…worthy of a standing ovation, etc).

    It seems like this way to use it sounds terribly
    weird. Am I right?.

    Thanks to everyone for your help.
     
    Last edited:

    Infininja

    Senior Member
    American English
    No English speaker I know would use plausible to mean worthy of applause. Plausible is similar to possible. The difference, in my understanding, is something that is possible could happen, whereas something that is plausible has evidence that points towards it having happened, but cannot be proven as such.

    Going off the Mythbusters example, they used 'plausible' as a middle ground between 'confirmed' and 'busted' to refer to things that the experiment shows could be true, but cannot be proven to have happened in history. As a made up example relating to the show, there could be a myth that someone jumped over the grand canyon on a tricycle. If, through their experiments, they showed this feat was possible, but turned up no evidence (police records, newspapers reports, etc.) that it had happened, it would be 'plausible,' rather than 'confirmed.'
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top