Pothohari: gashnai

  • Pothowari

    New Member
    English-UK and Pothowari
    1/yes its partly pothowari,partly punjabi

    gashnai is definitely pothowari, altho we would probably say

    pothowari: tusaan kudher gashnai ho (where do you go)

    2/ i would say jaande is a better equivalent tense in punjabi
    punjabi: "tusii kidher jaande ho" ?
     

    Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    Many thanks!

    Could you conjugate the verb in the present tense? And would Pakistani Panjabi speakers understand this word?

    Only those who are familiar with this dialect. As for conjugation, what kind of a Punjabigator are you if others have to conjugate Punjabi verbs for you!:)
     

    panjabigator

    Senior Member
    Am. English
    Pothohari speakers have argued to me that Pothohari is not Punjabi, and I am unfamiliar with the conjugations in this dialect. I can speak well in Majhi and Eastern dialects (or my hodgepodge of them), but I'm unfamiliar with this boli.
     

    Pothowari

    New Member
    English-UK and Pothowari
    "tusii kidher gashnai ho." (where do you go)

    a/ In the present tense it is spoken quite differently as "kudhar jula hain?" (where are you going?)

    b/ Most pakistani punjabi speakers would find it difficult to understand

    c/ Most linguists categorise pothowari in the punjabi group of languages (the potohar region is in pakistani punjab province), altho it is quite distinct and probably an older dialect than majhi dialects/punjabi spoken in Lahore,Faisalabad, Sialkot etc. So in summary it is technically punjabi,as its spoken in punjab, but its very different from the punjabi most people know/acknowledge.In fact its closer to 'Mirpuri'/pahari spoken in Azad Kashmir and Hindiko spoken in NWFP and Attock and surrounding areas.

    d/ By the way where are you based ?
     

    panjabigator

    Senior Member
    Am. English
    Pothohari Sahib:

    Thanks for this information. Could you provide conjugations that parallel the following set up?

    میں جاتا ہوں
    تو جاتا ھے
    یہ جاتا ھے
    ھم جاتے ھیں
    آپ جاتے ھیں
    یہ جاتے ھیں

    I've heard the "jula hain" before in other Punjabi dialects. I've looked a bit at Hindko and have heard "julnaa" for "chalna" before. Or was it "jaanaa"?

    Pothohari movies are available on youtube and I can get a bit if I focus. That said, they're quite difficult for me. It's less the vocab than the intonation.

    So, when speaking to someone from Lahore, would Pothohari speakers be able to transition to 'Punjabi' or would they choose Urdu? A know of someone who told me that their family members spoke dialects that were poles apart and therefore had to speak Urdu at home.

    Re part d), check for a PM. Thanks for your contributions after your long hiatus. I invite you to stick around and post more to fill in our Pothohari lacuna. I assure you, I have plenty of questions!
     

    Pothowari

    New Member
    English-UK and Pothowari
    main jaana haan (yaan)میں جاتا ہوں

    tu jaana hain تو جاتا ھے

    یہ جاتا ھے

    assan jaane haan ھم جاتے ھیں

    tussaan jaane ho آپ جاتے ھیں

    یہ جاتے ھیں

    some of the of the script is difficult to decipher, if you could write it in english it may be easier for me.
    Well, interesting you should ask about the scenario of speaking to someone from Lahore, as destiny would have it I am married to a Punjabi speaker from lahore!.We usually communicate in English, but with in-laws etc I have to speak my very limited Urdu.Some pothowari speakers are comfortable speaking Punjabi,not me though.Its easier for me to understand than speak.
    Keep the questions coming.
    Regards
     

    Pothowari

    New Member
    English-UK and Pothowari
    e.g "khath maare kol hona"

    "the letter is with me" (the 'hona' translates as possessive present tense,'to be'. In Urdu translates as 'hotha hai' I think)

    "khath meray paas 'hotha hai'"

    In the previous example
    "Yeh jaate hain" is simply "ae jaane honay" the 'honay' is equivalent to 'hain'

    "woh ja raha hoga" in Urdu would translate as "oh jaana pya hosi" so 'hoga' translates as 'hosi'
     

    Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    e.g "khath maare kol hona"

    "the letter is with me" (the 'hona' translates as possessive present tense,'to be'. In Urdu translates as 'hotha hai' I think)

    "khath meray paas 'hotha hai'"

    In the previous example
    "Yeh jaate hain" is simply "ae jaane honay" the 'honay' is equivalent to 'hain'

    "woh ja raha hoga" in Urdu would translate as "oh jaana pya hosi" so 'hoga' translates as 'hosi'

    Pothohari Sahib, salaam 'arz hai.

    Would I be right in saying that
    "khath maare kol hona" should really be "Khat mhaaRe kol hoNRaa e" where "hoNRaa e" is said in such a way that the two fuse into each other? In addition, your "ae jaane honay"" similarly has the auxiliary verb "to be" missing although, as I have stated above, in natural speech the "jaaNRaa" and the auxiliary verb merge into one another.

    Regarding whether a Lahori (or any other Punjabi speaker) would be able to understand a PoThwari/Mirpuri speaker (or vice versa), I think this is all a matter of getting used to each other's varieties of the language. You will no doubt agree that where PoThwari/Mirpuri and other Punjabi speakers live side by side, as they do in England, they all manage to communicate with each other perfectly well sticking to their own variety of the language. Some, of course, have learnt each other's variety too.
     

    Pothowari

    New Member
    English-UK and Pothowari
    Walaikum Salaam Qureshpor,

    Ive not heard Pothowari spoken in the way you describe, "hoNRaa e" is new to me.

    I agree with your comments about different Punjabi speakers communicating in their own dialects.
     

    panjabigator

    Senior Member
    Am. English
    I think this is a question of transliteration. QP Sahib's "NR" is a the retroflex sound you hear in the Punjabi word جانا. Sometimes this is written with two vertical dots over the noon.

    By the way, in the dialect spoken in our family's village, I do believe that the first person possessive pronoun is also "mhaaraa," said with a falling tone.
     

    Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    Walaikum Salaam Qureshpor,

    Ive not heard Pothowari spoken in the way you describe, "hoNRaa e" is new to me.

    I agree with your comments about different Punjabi speakers communicating in their own dialects.

    I think you might have misunderstood what I have said. I am suggesting that your "hoNRaa" essentially is "hoNRaa e" but the pronunciation merges the "e" to the "hoNRaa" in natural speech.
     
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