Potter’s Field

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Daniel A.

Senior Member
romanian
„“Where did he go to school?”
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“Potter’s Field,” she said. <---> Hugo called it the Eton for athletes, musicians and thugs. He meant it as a compliment.”
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Tony Parsons - The Murder Bag

Is very weird! With this Potter’ Field! I am confused. In context, he, his housband, studied at... cemetery?? I think not! So, what means here Poter’s Field? Variantes: A college... a town... Euphemistic, a place of dishonor and abandonment...I dont know...


<---> Text removed to comply with 4-sentence limit on quotation (Rule 4). Cagey, moderator.
 
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  • Glenfarclas

    Senior Member
    English (American)
    According to this review of the book, Potter's Field is "a public school that already existed at the time of Henry VIII – the monarch’s beloved dogs are buried in the school grounds." Presumably it is fictional.
     

    pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    It's the name of a school, according to this site's mention of the book:
    Much of the focus settles on Potter’s Field, a public school that already existed at the time of Henry VIII – the monarch’s beloved dogs are buried in the school grounds.
    Whether this is an actual school or one created by the author, I don't know, but perhaps we have a Londoner on here who does.

    Edit: Glen found the same website and posted faster.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    A school. As far as I'm aware it's fictitional. The description in your post and Glenfarclas's suggests an amalgam of Millfield School and something much older.
     

    RedwoodGrove

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    Just for the record, a public school in England is a place where the parents have to pay to send their kids to. In the US a public school is paid for by the state in which you live (e.g. California).

    I really doubt that "Potter's Field" is even remotely likely as a name for a school, especially one that has been in existence since the early 1500s.:)
     
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