Pounding the pavement [pound]

Gary_Kasparov

Senior Member
Spanish - Spain
The only thing I can tell activists is that if you don't have $40000, you really have to pound the payment day in and day out.

What does "pound the payment" mean?

Thank you!!!
 
  • JamesM

    Senior Member
    Just to underline what others have implied, I honestly think "pound the payment" is a mistaken interpretation of "pound the pavement."

    I agree with bibliolept that it means getting out and walking around, usually calling on businesses in person, either looking for work or searching for something. A detective could "pound the pavement" looking for clues to solve a murder or an actor could "pound the pavement" auditioning for roles, or a salesman could "pound the pavement" making cold calls to drum up new business. The most common use that I am aware of, however, is "searching for employment by calling on businesses." It is sometimes used figuratively, such as "I've been scouring job sites all day, pounding the pavement for new work."
     

    vicky1027

    Senior Member
    usa english
    I would intrpret it In this case to mean "you have to go door to door to try and raise money for your cause."

    Or "do whatever you have to do to raise money for your cause".
     

    bibliolept

    Senior Member
    AE, Español
    I'd take it to mean, as a guess, that if you don't have enough money for, say, an expensive newspaper ad or other advertising campaign then you must go out and talk to people one by one, door to door, to increase public awareness of your cause.
     

    vicky1027

    Senior Member
    usa english
    I'd take it to mean, as a guess, that if you don't have enough money for, say, an expensive newspaper ad or other advertising campaign then you must go out and talk to people one by one, door to door, to increase public awareness of your cause.
    Looking at the original phrase again, I think you're right. It's a much more general concept. :)
     

    gasman

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    Don't people who are running for parliament, or whatever system they have, "pound the pavement" in an attempt to gather votes?
     

    sergiofreeman

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Hi Friends!

    "Well you know for Grissom, the shortest distance between two points is science. For Catherine, it's pounding the pavement."
    -- Warrick Brown (Pledging Mr. Johnson)

    I would like to know the meaning of this expression, I suppose it means “hard work” or something like that, but I can’t be sure, so, need your opinion again, maybe it is and idiomatic expression I don’t know yet, in fact, I’m learning day by day new vocabulary, it is amazing how wide is English language.
    Many Thanks.
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    Hello sergiofreeman. :)

    I have merged your thread with an earlier thread on the same idiom. As you can see, the specific meaning of "pounding the pavement" depends on the context. What is the situation? What does Catherine do?
     
    "Pounding the pavement" means walking (or driving) a lot, stopping along the way, with the goal of accomplishing something. To "pound the pavement" looking for a job means to go around to different companies in person asking if they have any opening.

    Police officers "pound the pavement" when they make their rounds, checking in at various potential crime or trouble spots.

    In this case, drawn from CSI, a crime drama, I assume that Warrick is saying that Catherine's way of getter her job done is to visit the crime scene, track down witnesses, talk to the victim's neighbors, etc., rather than spend time in the lab studying fibers, insect remnants, latent fingerprints, and the like.
     
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