Pounding your bunny

Troupian

Member
G. Britain English
Has anyone heard (of) this expression? If so, do you think it is widespread in GB or strictly regional? [I know what it is supposed to mean!!]
 
  • irisheyes0583

    Senior Member
    English (USA)
    Good lord, the only thing that comes to mind when I see the phrase is something completely vulgar! :eek: :D

    Could you please enlighten us as to the meaning? Of course, this means that I have never heard of this phrase... and for reference, I was born & raised in the NE and now live in the mid-Atlantic/south of the USA.
     

    E-J

    Senior Member
    England, English
    I presume the expression doesn't refer to doing violence to one's pet rabbit.

    I've never heard of it, Troupian. (I'm from the South / East / South East)
     

    nycphotography

    Senior Member
    American English
    irisheyes0583 said:
    Good lord, the only thing that comes to mind when I see the phrase is something completely vulgar! :eek: :D

    Could you please enlighten us as to the meaning? Of course, this means that I have never heard of this phrase... and for reference, I was born & raised in the NE and now live in the mid-Atlantic/south of the USA.
    Well in general [physically abusing] your [nonsense word] usually means the same thing in english.

    pounding your pud
    choking your chicken
    punching your pig
    slapping your salami

    Go on and make up your own, its fun and easy:

    wrestling your python
    roasting your hot dog
    walking your schnauser
     

    irisheyes0583

    Senior Member
    English (USA)
    Hehe... it's a euphemism for exactly what I thought! :D Anyway, I have never heard it before. I have heard "walk the dog" and "choke the chicken", but that's about it & they're pretty uncommon. Frankly, you Brits are so proper! Over here, we just tell it like it is! ;) (I'm kidding...)
     

    E-J

    Senior Member
    England, English
    What surprises me is that, while nyc's interpretation is probably the correct one, the various creative expressions he proposes all appear to be synonymous with onanism of the masculine variety ... "Bunny", meanwhile, seems to me a word which has always had peculiarly feminine associations.
     

    irisheyes0583

    Senior Member
    English (USA)
    nycphotography said:
    Well in general [physically abusing] your [nonsense word] usually means the same thing in english.

    pounding your pud
    choking your chicken
    punching your pig
    slapping your salami

    Go on and make up your own, its fun and easy:

    wrestling your python
    roasting your hot dog
    walking your schnauser
    And, for the record, I think that while these are intended to be euphemistic, they actually sound far worse than the simple (and yes, more graphic) description of the act in question! :D
     

    GenJen54

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    E-J said:
    the various creative expressions he proposes all appear to be synonymous with onanism of the masculine variety ... "Bunny", meanwhile, seems to me a word which has always had peculiarly feminine associations.
    My thoughts exactly. Is it possible then, that the expression in question is describing an act that requires two people present?!
     

    E-J

    Senior Member
    England, English
    GenJen54 said:
    My thoughts exactly. Is it possible then, that the expression in question is describing an act that requires two people present?!
    Hmm, not necessarily. Women's liberation must have left SOME legacy, surely!! ;)
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Flying in the face of all you fantasists, here is a boring literal answer.

    I have never heard this expression.
    It does not appear to feature on Google.
    There is no evidence that it is in widespread use in GB or anywhere.

    Take any expression like this and, as NYC illustrates, it can be presumed to have an unorthodox meaning if it is associated with a dig in the ribs and a nudge, nudge, wink, wink.

    Fancy whipping the cream then? Anyone fancy putting some coal on the fire. Maybe we should put the bin out tonight. It's all so Monty Python.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    E-J: Maybe you and me should get together later. OK, so our bins were emptied on Monday night, but there's plenty of rubbish left...;)
    Are you into paper'n'plastic, organic, or just the standard stuff?
     

    Brioche

    Senior Member
    Australia English
    panjandrum said:
    Flying in the face of all you fantasists, here is a boring literal answer.

    I have never heard this expression.
    It does not appear to feature on Google.
    There is no evidence that it is in widespread use in GB or anywhere.

    Take any expression like this and, as NYC illustrates, it can be presumed to have an unorthodox meaning if it is associated with a dig in the ribs and a nudge, nudge, wink, wink.

    Fancy whipping the cream then? Anyone fancy putting some coal on the fire. Maybe we should put the bin out tonight. It's all so Monty Python.
    That reminds me of my sainted mother, who remarked that you don't look at the mantlepiece when you are stoking the fire.
     

    nycphotography

    Senior Member
    American English
    E-J said:
    What surprises me is that, while nyc's interpretation is probably the correct one, the various creative expressions he proposes all appear to be synonymous with onanism of the masculine variety ... "Bunny", meanwhile, seems to me a word which has always had peculiarly feminine associations.
    Yanno, I was thinking that these were all masculine references... and I stopped to think of any feminine ones, but none came to mind.

    But I have seen, just once: rubbing off
     

    E-J

    Senior Member
    England, English
    nycphotography said:
    But I have seen, just once: rubbing off
    One cannot convincingly talk, however, of "rubbing (off) your pud / chicken / pig / salami / python / hot dog / schnauser" ... Such farmyard and food-based images seems sadly out of place in the realm of female self-pleasure. You're right, none come to mind ...

    (pan ... organic, of course! One at least likes to know where it's been)
     

    nycphotography

    Senior Member
    American English
    E-J said:
    One cannot convincingly talk, however, of "rubbing (off) your pud / chicken / pig / salami / python / hot dog / schnauser" ... Such farmyard and food-based images seems sadly out of place in the realm of female self-pleasure. You're right, none come to mind ...

    (pan ... organic, of course! One at least likes to know where it's been)
    Well you can always rub your nub. Rub a dub dub, three... ok never mind.
     

    irisheyes0583

    Senior Member
    English (USA)
    nycphotography said:
    Yanno, I was thinking that these were all masculine references... and I stopped to think of any feminine ones, but none came to mind.

    But I have seen, just once: rubbing off
    Ok, this doesn't involve all the wonderful food/animal analogies we've been discussing, but I've often heard talk of "helping oneself out" in reference to women. (As in, "do you help yourself out?") :p Also, women can "play the violin"... :eek:

    I feel that this may degenerate into the type of discussion many people would not like to have, but there are some others (albeit not as ambiguous) that refer to both:

    Getting oneself off.
    Pleasuring oneself.
     

    ElaineG

    Senior Member
    USA/English
    I had typed a whole post about how there are female equivalents to the whole barnyard gerundial phrase thing (most involving various terms for the domestic feline or the, ahem, beaver), but I was too freaking embarrassed to post it. (The Internet is forever, after all!). Instead, I found this invaluable list, which you can peruse at your leisure : http://www.craigslist.org/about/best/sfo/9318178.html

    Going back to "pounding your bunny", I would say that "pounding" has a distinctly masculine feel, and therefore I concur with Pan that it's all about taking out the bins!
     
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