pour and poor pronunciation

merquiades

Senior Member
English (USA Northeast)
Inspired by a comment in the worn/warn link, I would like to know if you distinguish pour and poor. Someone said there is no difference in Utah, so do you make the difference? I do. "Pour" is with /or/ and poor is with /ur/.
 
  • bibax

    Senior Member
    Czech (Prague)
    British non-rhotic (as we learn it on the European Continent):

    pore and pour identically, like paw [po:];

    poor with a diphthong [pu@], like boor, moor, ...
     
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    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Here's a relevant recent thread, merquiades: poor (pronunciation). I'm one of those who have followed the trend described by etb in its post 2: for me "poor" and "pour" are homonyms, both rhyming with "more".
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    I'm afraid I vacillate between /pʊə/ and /pɔ:/ for poor. Similarly /ʃʊə/ or /ʃɔ:/ for sure. People here often say /kjɔ:/ for cure and /pjɔ:/ for pure too. I think the /ɔ:/ version for poor, tour and sure is very common in England and in Australia, but maybe less so for cure and pure. And the /ɔ:/ version is not used in Scottish accents.
     
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    JamesM

    Senior Member
    Pour, poor, paw and pore all sound pretty much identical when I say them.
    I suppose it is partially because of my spoken R's, but only pour and pore sound the same when I say them. Poor has an "oo" sound to it and "Paw" rhymes with "awe" (but not with "are" ;) ).

    Ewie, do "Moor" and "more" sound the same when you say them?
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Ewie, do "Moor" and "more" sound the same when you say them?
    I'm not ewie :)eek::eek::eek:) but yes, my "moor" and "more" are pronounced identically (to rhyme with "for"). I'm not sure (looking back at bibax's post 2) how I pronounce "boor"; it's not a word I use often. If someone held a gun to my head and made me say it aloud, I suspect I would use the old-fashioned RP pronunciation, with an 'oo' sound as in "boo" (and "glue").
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    I'm not ewie :)eek::eek::eek:) but yes, my "moor" and "more" are pronounced identically (to rhyme with "for").
    Mrs Not-Ewie, what about the name Moore? (I keep hearing 'Mrs Moore' [missiz moo-uh] in Passage to India.) ;)
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Mrs Not-Ewie, what about the name Moore? (I keep hearing 'Mrs Moore' [missiz moo-uh] in Passage to India.) ;)
    Well, Roger Moore - who my late mama lusted after big-time - was always (both for her and for me) Roger More. In Passage to India, I think it highly likely they're using the 'older-RP' pronunciation....
     

    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    I'm like Ewie, except that when I pronounce slowly and meticulously, my poor's and sure's do not rhyme with more. But that's certainly not what happens in every-day speech :)
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Like Mrs.Not-Ewie, my moor and Moor and more and maw and [Sir Roger] Moore and [Sir Thomas] More all sound exactly the same.

    Like Mrs.Nat-Loob (who are all these people?), my -ure words are less predictable, as are used-less-often words like boor (and Boer!) I'm fairly certain I've read somewhere that Experts predict that, in unrhotic BE at least, all these sounds will eventually 'collapse' into one > /ɔ:/.
     
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    merquiades

    Senior Member
    English (USA Northeast)
    I suppose it is partially because of my spoken R's, but only pour and pore sound the same when I say them. Poor has an "oo" sound to it and "Paw" rhymes with "awe" (but not with "are" ;) ).

    Ewie, do "Moor" and "more" sound the same when you say them?
    Great. We are in agreement here.
     
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