pour water in the bathtub / let water flow out of it

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ridgemao

Senior Member
Chinese - Mandarin
Hello:


Before taking a bath, you turn on the faucet(tap) to pour water in the bathtub.
After taking a bath, you turn on switch to let water flow out of the bathtub.


Are there any idiomatic simple expressions used for the two sentences in bold here? I think my sentences are a little long, how do you say them in daily life?



Thank you.
 
  • perpend

    Banned
    American English
    You could:
    draw a bath (let the water in the bathtub)
    drain a bath (let the water out of the bathtub)
     

    RM1(SS)

    Senior Member
    English - US (Midwest)
    I would say "fill the tub" and "drain the tub."

    Note the difference between BE bath and AE tub, both meaning the bathtub itself. In AE, bath means what is done in the bathtub (and is only a noun, not a verb as it can also be in BE).
     

    ridgemao

    Senior Member
    Chinese - Mandarin
    When my son and I are in the bathtub together, I patted the bathtub and say:
    1, I am going to drain this bathtub now.
    2, I am going to draw this bathtub now.
    3, I am going to run this bathtub now.

    Can I use "this" here? Thanks.
     

    dadane

    Senior Member
    English-London
    There is no grammatical reason why you can't use 'this', why you would choose do so is another matter. It seems unlikely that in everyday life you would need to stress which bath you are referring too, so 'the' will suffice, e.g. I'm going to run the bath now, I'm going to empty the bath now, etc. (Exact choice of words is dependent on the dialect of the speaker as previously mentioned).

    PS. I my world 'drawing a bathtub' would require a pen and paper.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    When my son and I are in the bathtub together, I patted the bathtub and say:
    1, I am going to drain this bathtub now.
    2, I am going to draw this bathtub now.
    3, I am going to run this bathtub now.

    Can I use "this" here? Thanks.
    If I was actually sitting in an empty bathtub, I think I'd use "fill" rather than "run", though I'd normally talk about "running (myself) a bath".

    If I was sitting in a full bathtub, I might say "I'm going to empty the bath now", though I'd be more likely to say "I'm going to pull the plug now".

    I wouldn't use "this" in either case:).

    (cross-posted with dadane)
     

    Biffo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    When my son and I are in the bathtub together, I patted the bathtub and say:
    1, I am going to drain this bathtub now.
    2, I am going to draw this bathtub now.
    3, I am going to run this bathtub now.

    Can I use "this" here? Thanks.
    1. Is possible.
    2. Is incorrect. You can draw (fill) a bath but you cannot draw a bathtub. (Not in the sense of "draw" that you mean)
    3. You can run a bath but you cannot run a bathtub.

    Reasons

    You can consider a bath to refer to the water. The water is placed in a bath tub.

    Originally, to draw water meant to draw (pull) it from from a well or stream or other source of water. If you 'draw a bath' it means you draw water from somewhere to fill the tub. These days, the water is 'drawn' from the taps. You can 'draw' [a bathful of] water but you cannot 'draw' a tub because it is a solid object.

    To 'run' a bath refers to 'running water'. When water flows it is said to run. Therefore 'to run' a bath means to allow water to flow into the tub. The water runs, the tub cannot run.

    Conclusion
    In British English it is slightly confusing because we have come to refer to a bathtub as a bath! (it's confusing, I know)

    BE: We fill a bath and we empty a bath.

    "I am going to fill the bath" :tick:
    "I am going to empty the bath" :tick:

    For American English see the appropriate answers above.
     
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