Powerfully bound

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undern

Senior Member
Italy, Italian
If you're physically describing a man, saying: "full lipped, broad-chested, powerfully bound", what does this last feature mean? Well-shaped? Well-shaped muscles?
Thanks
undern
 
  • undern

    Senior Member
    Italy, Italian
    It's a novel by an Italian-American writer, it's powerfully bound. Is it the only possible meaning anyway?
     

    El escoces

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    According to Miriam-Webster it means the muscles are enlarged and damaged, possibly due to excessive training. I think I've seen it (in a literary context, possibly old) but don't hear it used in BE on an everyday basis.
     
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    cyberpedant

    Senior Member
    English USA, Northeast, NYC
    "the muscles are enlarged and damaged,"
    This begins to make sense to me. We use the term, "muscle-bound," with this meaning. But "powerfully" here still doesn't ring true.
     

    El escoces

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    I think the meaning is clear though. The author has chosen to use the two words together, possibly erroneously, but I guess that's more a matter of literary criticism!

    When I think muscle-bound, I think Popeye. Does the cultural reference mean anything to you, undern?
     

    undern

    Senior Member
    Italy, Italian
    There is not that cultural reference, and it's not muscle-bound, but there's not much context: it is the description of a man never encountered before, everything is in the lines I'm going to report:

    "I lay propped on one elbow looking down at a colonel in full uniform in bed right next to me. His mouth was slightly open, his arms raised overhead, his legs crossed at the ankles. He was beautiful-full lipped, broad-chested, powerfully bound. He had a limp from a bullet in the knee. His wife ran a division of military intelligence."
     
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