"praise the Lord and pass the potato salad"

MariOliveira

New Member
Português - Brasil
Hello all
Could you please help me to find out the meaning of this expression in this context: "“The beauty of this book is that anyone involved in politics can find a use for it. It can be used as a reference guide for the press or as a playbook for political operatives. And if prospective GOP candidates find it useful to beat the hell out of one another, well, praise the Lord and pass the potato salad,” American Bridge President Brad Woodhouse told msnbc."
The full article is here: Democrats eager to help Republicans -- tear each other apart

Thank you
 
  • dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    And if prospective GOP candidates find it useful to beat the hell out of one another, well, praise the Lord and pass the potato salad
    He is referring to a Christian tradition that has existed for hundreds of years. Before starting each meal, the family is silent while one of them says a prayer, thanking God for the meal and for their time together as a family. If the family is not very religious, the prayer could be short.

    Years ago a comedian thought up the phrase in bold, with a prayer so short it is not even a full sentence. The speaker is thinking more about the potato salad than about God. The phrase makes the speaker look bad (un-religious, rude to God). Other than that it has no meaning.

    Because the phrase is funny, it has been repeated many times, as humor.

    It makes no sense in the Democrat's speech, unless he is mocking GOP candidates, implying they pretend to be very religious but are not. He is saying the sentence "as if he was one of them at a meal".

    All it means in this paragraph is "well, that is fine with me".
     
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