pram's walk

Priss

Senior Member
Ecuador/ Spanish
Hi!
I really can't understand "pram's walk" in this sentece. I don't think it has something to do with babies pram...

"It's hard to get good fresh vegetables round here, they are very tired up at the corner and nowhere else is in a pram's walk, really"

Thanks in advance for your answers.
 
  • Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Hi!
    I really can't understand "pram's walk" in this sentece. I don't think it has something to do with babies pram...

    "It's hard to get good fresh vegetables round here, they are very tired up at the corner and nowhere else is in a pram's walk, really"

    Thanks in advance for your answers.
    If there is no misprint I think this must be a young mother saying she's not going to push the pram as far as the next closest vegetable shop. You can get tired vegetables at the corner, but all the other shops are out of her range.
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    I think it has everything to do with a baby's pram. The woman might be willing to hike ten miles if she is not out with the pram -- but the distance one would walk while wheeling a pram (that is, a "pram's walk") is going to be far less. Since she can't leave the baby alone, her shopping is limited to things that are within a "pram's walk."
     

    bibliolept

    Senior Member
    AE, Español
    I think it has everything to do with a baby's pram. The woman might be willing to hike ten miles if she is not out with the pram -- but the distance one would walk while wheeling a pram (that is, a "pram's walk") is going to be far less. Since she can't leave the baby alone, her shopping is limited to things that are within a "pram's walk."
    This was my first thought, as well. What "threw me for a loop" was the fact that the original poster didn't seem to think it likely that this might involve a baby's pram. Priss, from your knowledge of the context, is there any chance at all that a baby might be present in that household?
     

    Priss

    Senior Member
    Ecuador/ Spanish
    Yes, there is a mother who says the sentence. I didn't think of that before, I was a bit confussed. But thank you for your help.
    This was my first thought, as well. What "threw me for a loop" was the fact that the original poster didn't seem to think it likely that this might involve a baby's pram. Priss, from your knowledge of the context, is there any chance at all that a baby might be present in that household?
     
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