pre-noun adjective

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alexiab

New Member
russian
I have a question regarding pre-noun adj. grammar rule
A customer who is pleased is sure to return. A pleased customer is sure to return. (When we eliminate the “To be” and the relative pronoun, we will also have to reposition the predicate adjective to a pre-noun position.)

And at the same time I found in the article: Officer John Montecino of the police said about 30 of the 170 families evacuated were given permission to return home. Shouldn't it be evacuated families?
 
  • Skribe1

    New Member
    English-American
    And at the same time I found in the article: Officer John Montecino of the police said about 30 of the 170 families evacuated were given permission to return home. Shouldn't it be evacuated families?
    In this example both are acceptable. They both mean the exact same thing, and in english they are understood exactly the same.
     
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    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    It might be helpful not to think of 'evacuated' in your example as an adjective, but as part of a reduced relative clause - only the relative pronoun and the verb BE are omitted.

    • I met a man who was walking to the park. --> I met a man walking to the park.
    • Some of the children who were rescued were badly injured --> Some of the children rescued were badly injured.
    • Customers who are annoyed by lack of help are unlikely to return --> Customers annoyed by lack of help are unlikely to return.
     

    alexiab

    New Member
    russian
    Thank you very much, but why it is written in the rule that have to reposition the predicate adjective to a pre-noun position. What is more common?
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    The distinction between an adjective and a verb (in the past participial form) is sometimes very difficult to describe. The item placed before the noun would be more adjective-like and the one after more verb-like. Consider the well-known phrase: a penny saved is a penny earned. You could (just about) say: a saved penny is an earned penny. The latter is more static, whereas in the former I'd be thinking about what people are doing (saving pennies and earning pennies). The choice depends on which you want to emphasise.
     
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    elshan1980

    Senior Member
    Azerbaijani
    Oxford Guide to English Grammar says "There are also other words expressing feelings which we can use attributively."
    a satisfied/contented customer
    NOT a pleased customer
    But I wonder why we can't use it?
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    I would say that we can and we do:

    The customer couldn't decide which shoes to buy. The salesman persuaded her to buy all three pairs, and gave her a big discount. The pleased customer said she would recommend the shop to all her friends.

    The magician produced a whole family of rabbits from his hat. The pleased spectators applauded vigorously.
     

    e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    There is nothing to say that you can't used pleased before a noun, but I don't find it natural. There are better adjectives and in #8 I would not use an adjective since applauded vigorously makes it obvious that they are pleased.

    There are lists of adjectives in grammar books which are never or rarely use attributively. One that springs to mind is awake.

    Here is a thread that discusses the use of articles formed from the past participle (like pleased): past participle as attributive adjective
     
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