precipitate vs precipitous

Sun14

Senior Member
Chinese
Hello, my friends,

I was wondering the difference between the two:

1) He made a precipitate decision.

2) He made a precipitous decision.

Thoughts: The decision is made within a short period of time without being planned.
 
  • veggie21

    Senior Member
    English England
    Hello, my friends,

    I was wondering the difference between the two:

    1) He made a precipitate decision.

    2) He made a precipitous decision.

    Thoughts: The decision is made within a short period of time without being planned.
    Hi
    I think sentence 1 is incorrect as 'precipitate' is a verb; 'precipitous' is the adjective.
    To express your idea in 1) yo might say, 'He rushed to make a decision' or 'He hurriedly made a decision'.
     

    wandle

    Senior Member
    English - British
    'Precipitate' may be a verb, a noun or an adjective. When it is an adjective, it means 'rushed', 'too hasty'.
    'The precipitate decison to sell the shares was proved wrong within days when their value doubled.'

    'Precipitous' is only an adjective and it is a physical description meaning 'steep', 'like a cliff'.
    'Suddenly, as the fog lifted, the climbers saw before them a precipitous slope.'

    According to Chambers English Dictionary 'precipitous' has also a rare meaning of 'precipitate': but that is so rare you could go a lifetime and never meet it. It is better to keep the adjective 'precpitate' for actions or decisions and 'precipitous' for physical descriptions.
     
    Last edited:

    Sun14

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    'Precipitate' may be a verb, a noun or an adjective. When it is an adjective, it means 'rushed', 'too hasty'.
    'The precipitate decison to sell the shares was proved wrong within days when their value doubled.'

    'Precipitous' is only an adjective and it is a physical description meaning 'steep', 'like a cliff'.
    'Suddenly, as the fog lifted, the climbers saw before them a precipitous slope.'

    According to Chambers English Dictionary 'precipitous' has also a rare meaning of 'precipitate': but that is so rare you could go a lifetime and never meet it. It is better to keep the adjective 'precpitate' for actions or decisions and 'precipitous' for physical descriptions.
    Got it. Thank you very much.
     
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