Precipitously, impetuously

lzarzalejo73

Senior Member
Spanish
I wonder if any of the two following words -the adverb or the adjective-, could be used in the following sentence. "Water flows impetuous, precipitously, along the Acequia Real canal, helping alders and love trees grow. Way up, in the palaces, Washington Irving rooms and his Cuentos de la Alhambra (Tales of the Alhambra), the thousand and one night tales of the Nasrid Kingdom". Thanks in advance for your kind cooperation.
 
  • Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    What are you trying to say? I don't think either word is a very good choice. One is about the water's emotions and the other has the water in a canal acting like water in a waterfall (going over a cliff).
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    Given the style of the piece, I think you can use this - it creates a clear image in my mind.

    (Crosspost with Myridon, who has other thoughts...)

    However: "Way up, in the palaces, Washington Irving rooms and his Cuentos de la Alhambra (Tales of the Alhambra), the Thousand and One Nights tales of the Nasrid Kingdom". is not a sentence...
     

    lzarzalejo73

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Thank you Myridon, I know it sounds odd but it is just what I wanted to say, except that I wasn't talking about the water's emotions but its fast flowing down a canal,like a waterfall precisely.
     

    lzarzalejo73

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Thank you PaulQ. You see, I'm translating from Spanish and that's the way the author has it. I'm hesitating whether I should add to it that former Washington Irving's rooms, where he (reportedly) wrote The Tales of the Alhambra, are not far up the hill from the previously described spot. Thank you again for your help.
     
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