predictably and regrettably

whyflies

Senior Member
Chinese
I see it in a test excerpt as follows:
"Under it,a Common Drug Review recommends to provincial lists which new drugs should be included,predictably and regrettably."
What does the italic part mean?
Thanks in anticipation.
 
  • Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Hi Whyflies,

    It means that this fact shouldn't surprise anyone (it could have been predicted), and is regrettable.

    I'm not sure that you've got all the quote down correctly.
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Does 'regrettable' here mean an action like to cancel something more than just a feeling?
    It's an adjective, Whyflies, not a noun. Its meaning is in the dictionary. If you say that something has happened regrettably, you probably mean that you regret or that people should or do regret the fact that it has happened.
     
    Last edited:

    whyflies

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Thanks a lot.I'll try to quote it more exactly.
    Oh,I just look up 'regret' and I know it's just a matter of feeling.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top