Predominate over/dominate over

Albertovna

Senior Member
Russian - Russia
Dear Friends,

Can the preposition "over" be used with the verb "to predominate"?

(1) In infants, sleeping predominates over other activities (source: invented by me).

(2) In infants, sleeping dominates over other activities (source: invented by me).

Is sentence (2) wrong?
 
  • Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Both sentences are wrong. "Dominate" includes the sense of "over" so sentence 2 would be correct without "over". "Predominate" has a slightly different meaning so I don't think it is appropriate in this sentence.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    The link is mainly citing other dictionaries so it largely depends on which dictionary you are looking at so perhaps I am inventing a difference. In one dictionary (Merriam-Webster), the intransitive use of predominate is listed first while dominate has its transitive use listed first. Since this sentence is transitive (the verb has an object), I suppose that's why "dominate" feels better to me. This intransitive sentence seems okay to me:
    Among infant activities, sleeping predominates / sleeping is predominant.
     

    EStjarn

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    I have always believed that "dominate" means only "to have power,"...
    In Ambition dominated their lives (from AHD:s entry for dominate), 'dominated' means 'exerted a strong influence on' rather than 'had power over'.

    I have always believed that "dominate" [does not mean] "outnumber, be more important than."
    According to Collins English Dictionary (same link as above), 'dominate' may take the sense of "predominate in (something or someone)," which in turn means being of or having greater quantity or importance.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I'm intrigued by Myridon's answer.

    Albertovna's sentence (1) works for me (though not her sentence (2)...):)
     
    Last edited:

    Albertovna

    Senior Member
    Russian - Russia
    According to Collins English Dictionary (same link as above), 'dominate' may take the sense of "predominate in (something or someone)," which in turn means being of or having greater quantity or importance.
    Could you give an example, please? I found no suitable examples on the freedictionary page.
     

    EStjarn

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Perhaps "dominate in numbers" will do? These are examples from Google Books:

    a) From that point on, newcomers came to dominate in numbers, hovering around sixty percent for the next several years.

    b) National universities no longer dominate in numbers, although they may still be the leaders.

    c) In only a few committees did the women fail to dominate in numbers...
     

    Albertovna

    Senior Member
    Russian - Russia
    What about "prevail"? This word can be synonymous to "predominate," can it not? However, "to prevail over somebody" means "to defeat somebody." Thus, the word "prevail" does not go together with "over" when synonymous to "predominate." Am I right?
     
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