Preferential policies

frenchaudrey

Senior Member
French, France
Hi. I'm translating a contract and I came across the term "preferential policies". I'm not sure of its meaning. Does it mean "policies that have priority" ?
The context is : "if the government put new preferential policies during the term of this contract..." (the government is one of the parties to the contract)
Thanks a lot
 
  • Kelly B

    Senior Member
    USA English
    frenchaudrey said:
    ...Does it mean "policies that have priority" ?
    I don't think so. I would expect it to mean policies that favor (prefer) something over something else. Perhaps they favor a certain class of contractor; perhaps they favor a certain minority group. Without more context it's hard to tell.
     

    Joelline

    Senior Member
    American English
    I agree completely with Kelly B. In the US "preferential policies" is a code phrase usually used for favoring some group perceived to be disadvantaged: women, minorities, those who live below the poverty line, etc.

    I say "usually used" because it can also mean giving preferences to such disperate "avantaged groups" such as big-business, labor unions, democrats or republicans!

    When I see "preferential policies" in a newspaper article, I pay close attention to the fine print.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    I'd like to see a little more context, if possible, and check what we have - there is something odd about "... the government put new preferential policies during the term ..." .

    It sounds as if this is the authority to the contract (the government in this case) wishing to insert a clause that that allows them to change the contract terms if a change in their policy would make that advantageous.

    I would, as Joelline suggests, pay very close attention to this section of the contract. I would also pay an expensive lawyer to check it out for me:)
     

    erin2282

    Member
    English, California
    I found this from a political science thesis by Asa Bruhagen from Jonkoping International Business School, maybe it will help.

    Preferential policies as a concept seem to rely upon the existence of a discrimination of some sort. If there is no discrimination, there is nothing to set right. Many different expressions are used as synonyms of preferential policies. The expression “affirmative action” is American.
     

    Joelline

    Senior Member
    American English
    What I find most interesting is that it was those from the US who were first "suspicious" of the term! We've all seen it used as gov-speak far too often not to be suspicious.
     

    A90Six

    Senior Member
    England - English.
    frenchaudrey said:
    Hi. I'm translating a contract and I came across the term "preferential policies". I'm not sure of its meaning. Does it mean "policies that have priority" ?
    The context is : "if the government put new preferential policies during the term of this contract..." (the government is one of the parties to the contract)
    Thanks a lot
    Just a thought: Doesn't the "put" require a preposition somewhere in the sentence?
     

    Joelline

    Senior Member
    American English
    A90,

    "if the government put new preferential policies during the term of this contract..."

    Panj also noted something wrong with the sentence. Without more information, we can't tell what the problem is. It could be a missing "in" (the government put in...) or something else that's missing. But, yes, something is amiss here.
     

    A90Six

    Senior Member
    England - English.
    Joelline said:
    A90,

    "if the government put new preferential policies during the term of this contract..."

    Panj also noted something wrong with the sentence. Without more information, we can't tell what the problem is. It could be a missing "in" (the government put in...) or something else that's missing. But, yes, something is amiss here.
    I know we only have a small piece to work with, but even so, to place the preposition, whether it be "in", "forward", "about" or "across" so far from the verb would not sound right at all. Then again, perhaps it was just an omission by the questioner.
     

    frenchaudrey

    Senior Member
    French, France
    Thanks to all of you for your help.
    I didn't put more context because it's the only clear reference made to the government in the text, it is generally referred to as a "normal" contractor, so this wouldn't help much.
    Concerning grammar mistakes, I think it may be one since there are plenty of them in the text.
    Once again thanks a lot :)
     
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