prendere un'opzione

firstangel

Member
italian
Dear all,
I need your help with an expression that I can't quite translate into English: in Italy we use PRENDERE UN'OPZIONE meaning to make a reservation (for a flight or a hotel or such), but not a real booking.
That is, you have those seats on that flight (or that room in that hotel) reserved under your name for at least a couple of days (so that you can decide wether to confirm the reservation or not), but in case you cancel it you won't pay any cancellation fees.
It's specifically a touristic expression, it doesn't relate to any true meaning of OPZIONE, ie choice or such.
I've heard sentences like TO TAKE AN OPTION, or OPTION CALL but I'm not really sure they're right, and that english speaking people would understand.
Can anyone help me here? Thank you so much!!
F
 
  • firstangel

    Member
    italian
    Ciao Paul, sì purtroppo diciamo così, ma solo in campo turistico e solo fra addetti. Ho cominciato a lavorare in questo campo circa 5 anni fa e non avevo mai sentito "opzione" e "prendere un'opzione" usati con questa accezione!
     

    TimLA

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    This is very interesting, because I'm not sure we have something similar in AE.
    In general, when you book/reserve, you always "have a reservation" but it will be "covered/secured/unsecured/unpaid" etc.

    "Reservation option" would be understood, but I'm not sure how natural it would be.

    But depending on the entire sentence and context I would vote for something like:

    "unsecured reservation"
    or
    "your seats/places will be held"

    Do you have something specific?
     

    Leo57

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Dear all,
    I need your help with an expression that I can't quite translate into English: in Italy we use PRENDERE UN'OPZIONE meaning to make a reservation (for a flight or a hotel or such), but not a real booking.
    F
    Hi there
    I think here we can make a "tentative booking" and the duration of it (at no cost) will be at the discretion of the hotelier (or whoever). In other words it can be cancelled within a certain time without paying anything. I have no personal experience of doing this except for reserving meals and rooms in a hotel.

    Ciao
    Leo:)
     

    baldpate

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    I've often encountered the adjective "provisional" used for the initial stage of a booking/reservation, in which a reservation is made and will be held for a limited period only, subject to confirmation. If not confirmed within the time period, the booking is lost. If confirmed, there may be financial penalties (cancellation charges, full or partial loss of deposit etc) if the the booking is subsequently cancelled or changed.

    So you might, for example, see a statement like this on a booking form:

    "A provisional booking will be made and held for up to 20 days. To secure the room, you must confirm this period. A non-refundable deposit of 10% will be charged to your credit card upon confirmation"

    I think the terms of a "provision booking" would vary from case to case, though - like Tim, I don't know if there is a standard term which is universally understood in the tourism industry.
     

    Leo57

    Senior Member
    UK English
    "Provisional booking" is excellent Baldpate, it got many many more hits than "tentative booking". What can I say, I'm almost a dinasour!:D but I can still trip the light fantastic now and again!

    Ciao
    Leo:)
     

    firstangel

    Member
    italian
    Thanks guys, you've been very helpful!!
    I'm currently using "provisional booking" every day at work and it sounds just great!

    Ciaooooo

    Federica
     
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