preparation includes <procurement/obtaining> of an appliance.

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makhtubi

Member
bulgarian
The preparation stage includes ............ of (some brand and model) appliance. (By an end user - not acquisition)

Also, can we say "exploitation of equipment" meaning using it, or today exploit is more used as a synonym for abuse?
 
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  • entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    If you just mean buying or getting an appliance, say so. 'Procure' and 'obtain' are unnecessarily formal. In a business/legal context, 'procurement' has a different meaning, anyway. (It involves contracts with suppliers.)
     

    makhtubi

    Member
    bulgarian
    Thanks, but since it's a report, I have to be a bit formal. Which of the two sounds better?

    Also, on my second question? I added it here so as not to flood the forum with many threads.. :)
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    Being formal doesn't mean using unnecessarily wordy language. Use 'buy' or 'get', unless you don't mean them.

    And we ask for one question per thread please.
     

    makhtubi

    Member
    bulgarian
    OK, then I'll start a new thread. So you mean 'procure' and 'obtain' are not typically used in contemporary English or what?
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    The preparation stage includes ............ of (some brand and model) appliance.

    This is far too abstract - modern English prefers more concrete language, such as:
    The preparation begins when the customer buys/receives (some brand and model) appliance.
     

    makhtubi

    Member
    bulgarian
    Well, I'm acting as a translator here, can't edit the source text that much.. Neither sounds good to me. There are certain standarts about the wording of scientific summaries and reports.. They have to be abstract. Also, the sentence has to lack a subject so it encompass broadest range of persons, both pro and non-pro..

    So, if we limit choice to the two from the title, is there any difference which one I use?
     

    makhtubi

    Member
    bulgarian
    ОК then, thank you. I also read that acquisition is used about corporations, so the only option left for me must be obtaining..
     

    e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    The problem with procure and procurement is that, although they can have an ordinary meaning (e.g. get hold of/obtain), they tend to be formal.

    So if you want to shoot rabbits in the UK, you have to procure (=obtain) a firearms certificate (from the police), as far as I know.

    You have not said whether procure entails buying or simply to get hold of something.
    It would also sound odd if you talked about going to the shops to procure a DVD player, when you mean get.
     

    Bongone

    Senior Member
    English - Australia
    ОК then, thank you. I also read that acquisition is used about corporations, so the only option left for me must be obtaining..
    Acquisition is a neutral term for getting or obtaining. It has no corporate overtones, and carries with it the formality you are seeking.
     

    e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    I disagree about acquisition. In the context of a company it means to buy the shares of another company, for example, or to take over a company.

    If there are any neutral verbs, they are not acquire or procure.
     

    makhtubi

    Member
    bulgarian
    You have not said whether procure entails buying or simply to get hold of something.
    Well yeah, in my case it implies buying since it's about long-term use of specialized equipment that is unlikely to be rented due to it's nature..
     

    AngelEyes

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    The preparation stage includes ............ of (some brand and model) appliance. (By an end user - not acquisition)

    Also, can we say "exploitation of equipment" meaning using it, or today exploit is more used as a synonym for abuse?
    Perhaps one of these would work:

    The preparation stage includes acquiring a (brand and model appliance.)
    The preparation stage includes purchasing a (brand and model appliance.)


    However, includes wouldn't be my word choice. I'd use begins with.

    The preparation stage begins with acquiring a (brand and model appliance.)
    The preparation stage begins with purchasing a (brand and model appliance.)
     
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    AngelEyes

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    You're welcome, Makhtubi. Tell me, what exactly is the "preparation stage" in your example here?
     
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