preposition ب

Anne58

Senior Member
English
Hello,

I'm trying to come up with some basic rules for when to use some of the Arabic prepositions . . . in this instance ب

Please correct me where I am wrong.

- at: as a preposition relating to a place
(at the university, at the shop)
بالجامعة ، بالدكان


- with: when preforming actions
(He killed the snake with the stone, She opened the door with the key)
قتل الحية بالحجر ، فتحت الباب بالمفتاح

**apologies for the second sentence by I do not know thw word for unlock . . .

-by: when referring to transportation
(He went to the city by car)
ذهب الى المدينة بالسيّارة
 
  • The examples you gave are correct. Keep in mind, however, that there are many more meanings to the preposition; it's probably the most used preposition in Arabic and shares meanings with some other prepositions as well as it's own meanings. It's also used زائدة, which means that has no specific meaning and omitting it does not affect the meaning. Example: بحسبك كذا has the same meaning as حسبك كذا.
     
    Yes, and أرسله and أرسل به have the same meaning. So, here it is زائد too.
     
    العتبي قال: بعث عمر بن الخطاب إلى عمرو بن معد يكرب أن يبعث إليه بسيفه المعروف بالصّمصامة، فبعث به إليه، فلما ضرب به وجده دون ما كان يبلغه عنه، فكتب إليه في ذلك، فرّد عليه: إنما بعثت إلى أمير المؤمنين بالسيف، ولم أبعث بالساعد الذي يضرب به.

    I believe it's زائدة here, too, and the above means the same thing as the following:

    العتبي قال: بعث عمر بن الخطاب إلى عمرو بن معد يكرب أن يبعث إليه بسيفه المعروف بالصّمصامة، فبعثه إليه، فلما ضرب به وجده دون ما كان يبلغه عنه، فكتب إليه في ذلك، فرّد عليه: إنما بعثت إلى أمير المؤمنين السيف، ولم أبعث الساعد الذي يضرب به.
     
    Doesn't بعثت إلى أمير المؤمنين بالسيف mean

    I sent (a message) to the head of the believers (inscribed) on a sword
     
    No, Ali Smith is correct, it is indeed زائدة. It means “I sent him the sword and did not send the arm that wields it.
     
    I looked up بعث in a dictionary (which I should have done the first time but I just thought I knew!) and it seems that مفعول بعث is person that has been sent not the item sent. The dictionary specifically mentions ويتعدى بالباء for the item sent.

    Hence my previous post is incorrect, and you are right Abbe, the باء is not زائدة, it’s للتعدّي.
     
    But this verb is already transitive (متعدي), isn't it? It's not like, say, صَلَّى, as in صلّى بنا "He made us pray."
     
    If I understand Mahaodeh correctly it takes one direct object بعثه and an indirect object with the help of ب
    بعثه به. When you say بعث به it's understood that the first object has been omitted.

    Ps صلّى بنا means He lead us in prayer
     
    Last edited:
    But look here

    هُوَ الَّذِي أَرْسَلَ رَسُولَهُ بِالْهُدَىٰ وَدِينِ الْحَقِّ لِيُظْهِرَهُ عَلَى الدِّينِ كُلِّهِ وَلَوْ كَرِهَ الْمُشْرِكُونَ

    What does ب mean here? Remember that أرسل is the same meaning as بعث.
     
    It means with. He sent His Prophet with guidance
    That might make sense in English, for both بِ and مَعَ usually have the same translation: with.

    However, you must remember that they are not synonymous. بِ means 'by means of', while مَعَ means 'in the company of'. So, أَرْسَلَ رَسُولَهُ بِالْهُدَىٰ seems to mean 'He sent his messenger by means of guidance.' :confused:
     
    The letter باء can have different meanings depending on the context, one of them is المصاحبة and it has the same meaning as مع
     
    : باء المصاحبة، المثال القرآني الأبرز عليها قوله سبحانه: {يا نوح اهبط بسلام منا} (هود:48)، قال ابن عاشور: "الباء للمصاحبة، أي: اهبط مصحوباً بسلام منا. ومصاحبة السلام -الذي هو التحية- مصاحبة مجازية". ونظير هذا قوله عز وجل: {ادخلوها بسلام آمنين} (الحجر:46)، أي: ادخلوا الجنة مصحوبين بالسلامة، والمعنى: مُسلَّماً عليكم، كما حكي عن الملائكة أنهم يدخلون على أهل الجنة، يقولون: {سلام عليكم} (الرعد:24).
     
    Here's another example of the preposition بِ being used in the sense of المصاحبة:

    مُّهْطِعِينَ إِلَى الدَّاعِ ۖ يَقُولُ الْكَافِرُونَ هَٰذَا يَوْمٌ عَسِرٌ (8) ۞ كَذَّبَتْ قَبْلَهُمْ قَوْمُ نُوحٍ فَكَذَّبُوا عَبْدَنَا وَقَالُوا مَجْنُونٌ وَازْدُجِرَ (9) فَدَعَا رَبَّهُ أَنِّي مَغْلُوبٌ فَانتَصِرْ (10) فَفَتَحْنَا أَبْوَابَ السَّمَاءِ بِمَاءٍ مُّنْهَمِرٍ (11)
    (القمر)

    So We opened the doors of the sky with pouring water.
     
    I don't think so

    والباء في قوله: بِماءٍ للتعدية على المبالغة، حيث جعل الماء كالآلة التي يفتح بها، كما تقول: فتحت بالمفتاح
     
    Hello,

    I'm trying to come up with some basic rules for when to use some of the Arabic prepositions . . . in this instance ب

    Please correct me where I am wrong.

    - at: as a preposition relating to a place
    (at the university, at the shop)
    بالجامعة ، بالدكان


    - with: when preforming actions
    (He killed the snake with the stone, She opened the door with the key)
    قتل الحية بالحجر ، فتحت الباب بالمفتاح

    **apologies for the second sentence by I do not know thw word for unlock . . .

    -by: when referring to transportation
    (He went to the city by car)
    ذهب الى المدينة بالسيّارة
    Maybe these expressions are not so deep as the previous ones, but don't forget the preposition "with" without any implicit action: قهوة بالبن (coffee with milk), لحم حار بالسمسم (spicy meat with sesame) and so on 😏
     
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