Preposition: ... <at, in, on> the weekend?

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  • dbelle4500

    Senior Member
    Yes, I would agree.

    At the weekend is best. On the weekend is OK, but not in the weekend.

    It is confusing, as you would say "in the week", and not on or at the week !

    I hope this helps.
     

    Schintom86

    New Member
    English, U.S.A (Texas)
    Haha, I have never in my life heard someone say "at the weekend." But then again the Brits are the ones who invented the language, who can argue.

    But if you come to the United States/Texas I would say "on the weekend" only.
     

    Reving Lane

    Member
    USA, English
    Schintom86 said:
    Haha, I have never in my life heard someone say "at the weekend." But then again the Brits are the ones who invented the language, who can argue.

    But if you come to the United States/Texas I would say "on the weekend" only.
    My vote goes to "on the weekend." Like Schintom86, I have never heard "at the weekend" used in the U.S.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    How curious - I had always thought that "on the weekend" was OzE, but I'll happily include AE now.

    The answer could, of course, be over ...
    You do not need to do (something) over the weekend.

    Unfortunately we are really left rather in the dark because Claude, as usual, has not provided enough context.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    I was just telling someone yesterday that I would never say "at the weekend" - that's distinctly British English.

    In American English, both "on" and "over" are acceptable.

    I don't know of a variety of English in which "in" would work.
     

    Ume

    Banned
    Japanese
    Hello.

    "I do the washing-up every morning, and I normally do some washing and ironing at the weekend. I hoover the carpets once a week."

    "at the weekend"
    Do Americans say "on the weekend" instead?
    Does this mean a specific weekend? Would it be okay to say "on weekends"?
     

    Luccent

    Member
    English and Welsh, Wales
    "at",I think, is strictly an incorrect preposistion to use, although you can get away with it in general speech probably without native speakers noticing:
    However, one does not say:

    "At Monday"

    I would say "on" and I am British.

    One uses "at" for time, "on" for days of the weeks, and "in" for months.

    Not that you would ever say this, but it gives an example of how to use it:

    In April, I wash the car at seven o'clock on Mondays.

    On the weekend does not necessarily refer to any particular weekend, in the same way that "this weekend" would, although you can use "On weekends, I wash the car", or "On the weekend, I wash the car" for a more generalised.
     

    cas29

    Senior Member
    Canada/English
    Americans and Canadians tend to use "on" as the preposition for the weekend.

    You can say "on weekends I generally do the ironing".
    "I do the ironing on the weekend" is also correct.

    You might also want to say "I'm going away for the weekend" which would mean "this" weekend, or a specific weekend currently being discussed. (Will you come to dinner the 3rd weekend in May? -Oh, I'd love to but I'm going to New York for the weekend/that weekend"
    What are you doing this weekend? I'm going skiing for the weekend.
     

    cas29

    Senior Member
    Canada/English
    Luccent said:
    "at", is an incorrect preposistion to use.
    .
    I do not think it is "incorrect". You may not use it, but I have many many grammar books and every one of them (all produced in Europe) cite the British usage as being "at the weekend" , and the "American" as being "on"....
    (I put "American" in quotes because it is not always the same as Canadian English, but many people think they are the same.)
     

    cas29

    Senior Member
    Canada/English
    ah, you changed as I was typing! :)

    "at" sounds weird to me too, and I always point out to my students that while the grammar books show it, not everyone uses it. Now I can tell them some Brits don't even use it -great!
     

    Luccent

    Member
    English and Welsh, Wales
    Now, I say that we don't use it - I'm from Wales, my cousins live in Cardiff and they do use it. But it's an urban dialect and I don't regard that as correct usage. In Newcastle, and Cardiff, they tend to abuse "at" putting it in lots of places where I don't think it should be used. Where is sth. at? or Where is someone at? Hmmm. Languages constantly change...
     

    sted81

    New Member
    English (UK)
    I'm from the North of England and I think "at the weekend" is rarely used.

    Just to throw another spanner into the works.
    "What did you do over the weekend?"

    That is used quite a lot in my area!
     

    mjscott

    Senior Member
    American English
    The Great Pacific Northwest: Never heard "at the weekend."

    "on the weekend" (usually referring to the upcoming weekend or the weekend in context)
    "on weekends" (to explain something I do generally every weekend or during the weekends in context)
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    To summarise the copious previous discussions:

    AE says on the weekend, so does OzE.

    BE says at the weekend - but there is a developing generational difference in usage as those who have been steeped in OzE soaps grow older.

    << Mod comment:
    For convenience, I have merged previous posts on the same topic into this thread>>
     

    Kelly B

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Please clarify what you would like to say, preferably with a complete sentence.

    If you do it frequently, then you do it on weekends.
    If you will do it soon, you might do it next/this weekend.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    To summarise copious previous discussions:

    AE says on the weekend, so does OzE.

    BE says at the weekend - but there is a developing generational difference in usage as those who have been steeped in OzE soaps grow older.
     

    emma42

    Senior Member
    British English
    I second Panj, but, even across generations, I would say that "At the weekend" is far more common than "On the weekend" in English English.

    "At weekends" means that you always do such and such at the weekend or at weekends:

    I visit my mum at weekends - I can't manage it in the week because of work.

    What do you do at weekends? I don't usually do anything much - just relax.

    "At the weekend" can be more specific, but does not have to be. It can be as general as "at weekends":

    What are you doing at the weekend? I'm going to the theatre.

    What do you do at the weekend? [ie every weekend] Do you play sport or just sit around reading like me?

    I hope this has helped.
     

    Karmele3

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Spain
    Thank you!

    I knew that "on the weekend" was Am E. I needed Br E

    So both "at the weekend" or "at weekends" are correct.

    Cheers
     
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