Preposition: the tech bubble of 2000

Toutoublue

New Member
Mandarin - China
The title is picked out from a CNN article, talking about tech stock's soaring this year, and comparing the rise this year to that of 2000.

I saw two phrases:
This run-up is nothing like the tech bubble of 13 years ago.
There are big divergences between now and the tech bubble of 2000.
I'm wondering whether I could say them another way:
This run-up is nothing like the tech bubble 13 years ago. (I guess I can say "This run-up is nothing like the tech bubble last year." omiting the preposition.)
There are big divergences between now and the tech bubble in 2000.

Why does CNN employ "of" here?

Thanks to whoever helps me out.
 
  • Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    Hello Toutoublue, and Welcome to the Forum! :)

    >> Why does CNN employ "of" here?

    I think it boils down to editorial choice; or habit - more likely the latter.

    I see no difference in meaning, if that's what you're asking. I've a feeling that 'of' is often used in precisely this kind of context.

    It's arguable that using 'of' makes it sound more momentous; more 'historical'. :)
     

    Toutoublue

    New Member
    Mandarin - China
    Thank you so much, Beryl from Northallerton!

    Actually I want to know whether the phrases I made below are correct or not:

    This run-up is nothing like the tech bubble 13 years ago.
    This run-up is nothing like the tech bubble last year.
    This run-up is nothing like the tech bubble of last year.

    Is 'of last year' grammatically correct? If it's correct, between 'last year' and 'of last year', which sounds more natural to your ears?As far as I'm concerned, 'last year' and '13 years ago' are acting as noun when following 'of', and serving as adverb if 'of' precedes them.
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    Welcome from me, too. :)
    This run-up is nothing like the tech bubble 13 years ago.
    This run-up is nothing like the tech bubble last year.
    This run-up is nothing like the tech bubble of last year.

    Is 'of last year' grammatically correct?
    Yes.

    If it's correct, between 'last year' and 'of last year', which sounds more natural to your ears?
    They both sound natural to me. I guess I'd be more likely to include "of".
     

    Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    Yes, I'd say all three of your sentences are grammatically correct, more or less.

    I think we tend to start including the 'of' when we're talking about something that we consider momentous, or cataclysmic and hopefully singular.

    If tech bubbles happened weekly, I think it unlikely that we'd say 'the tech bubble of last week'.
    If it were that regularised, I suspect we'd say last week's tech bubble, or even last year's.

    We wouldn't say, unless in jest, 'the burnt toast of yesteryear'.

    Where it comes from, I'm not sure. Earlier, I was havering on about it being a journalistic cliché, but since then I've been visited by 'the Ghost of Christmas past', and although that's not a time marker, it has a similarly doom-laden heft to it.
     
    Last edited:

    Linkway

    Senior Member
    British English
    'The tech bubble of 13 years ago" --- indicates that you are talking about a tech bubble that is regarded as specific to that year.
    'The tech bubble 13 years ago" --- this could be a tech bubble that started earlier and/or finished later than 13 years ago.


    Similarly, "The sub-Saharan drought of 2005 was not as bad as the drought of 2004" versus "Sub-Saharan drought in 2005 was not as bad as in the previous year".

    I realise that these examples may not be totally convincing - I am trying to show that including "of" often indicates some kind of "ownership" or strong association with the given year, rather than mentioning that year as part of an ongoing thing that that occurs over many years.

    I hope the hole I have dug for myself is not too deep and that someone will come to my rescue.:)
     

    Toutoublue

    New Member
    Mandarin - China
    I'm so grateful to all your kind help !

    So we'd be more likely to include 'of' when referring something momentous, like a milestone down in the history.

    When it comes to some tiny things, we tend to omit 'of', like 'I like last Friday's TV program' or 'I like the TV program last Friday', considering that the TV program is broadcast every Friday.

    The reason why I got confused is that I've seen a lot of 'last year', 'this year', 'next year' without any prepositions included. Now I got it clear that there are some slight differences in meaning, although they are all grammatically correct and natural.

    PS: Linkway, your example is convincing enough for me. =)
    "Thanks to the industrial revolution of the 18th century, the medern society headed into a new age." Is that right?
     
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