prepositional phrasal verbs VS adverbial phrasal verbs

Discussion in 'English Only' started by Hela, Feb 2, 2006.

  1. Hela Senior Member

    Tunis
    Tunisia - French
    Dear friends,

    Is the way to parse a phrasal verb is to see if the verb can be separated from its particle by an adverb or not? Examples:

    1) "They were shone on by the everlasting Sun". Here "shine" and "on" cannot be separated by an adverb so it is considered as an adverbial phrasal verb because “on” here is an adverb?

    2) but if we put an adverb into "shine on" like "The sun shone brightly on us" "shine on" is not an adverbial phrasal verb anymore because “on” here is a preposition?

    3) but when analysing "he turned down the radio volume" I was told that "down" was an adverb because we could separated it from the verb by the object = "he turned the radio volume down".

    So now I'm completely lost!
    Hela
     
  2. DaleC Senior Member

    << Bare links deleted.>>

    My answer to your question has two parts.

    1. The important fact is that separation of the particle word ("to, on, away", etc.) from the VERB is NOT a relevant criterion. The relevant criterion is the position of the particle relative to the OBJECT.

    2. As for separating the particle from the verb, you need to distinguish between "can be separated" and "must be separated". The great majority of sentences with a phrasal verb have two possible word orders (for either type of phrasal verb).
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 20, 2010
  3. bhcesl Member

    USA/English
    I'm not sure that I am answering the right question here, but a phrasal verb is generally a verb which fits two criteria:

    1. It consists of a verb and one or more particles (preps).
    2. The words which comprise the verb mean something different when separated.

    This means that 'to shine on someone' is a verb and an adverbial phrase. It also means 'to show up' is a phrasal because 'to show' is 'to demonstrate' and 'up' is a direction. If taken literally, it doesn't make sense.

    Whether a phrasal verb is separable or not is completely irrelevant. Some phrasals require separation, others are optional, and still others are inseparable.

    I am sure that there are linguists out there who have studied this topic to death and would have a much more complex answer than this, but I find that the two criteria mentioned above are sufficient for identifying a phrasal verb.
     
  4. bartonig Senior Member

    UK English
    1) "They were shone on by the everlasting Sun". Here "shine" and "on" cannot be separated by an adverb so it is considered as an adverbial phrasal verb because “on” here is an adverb?

    Put the sentence in an active rather than passive form: The sun shone on them. One point is that when you intone this sentence the lexical verb shone is stressed - not on. Another is that on cannot be moved after the pronoun them. In general, shine on would be classed at most as a prepositional verb. I say at most because shine and on retain their ordinary meanings. So, shine on could be classed as a free combination of a verb and a preposition - ie. nothing special.

    2) but if we put an adverb into "shine on" like "The sun shone brightly on us" "shine on" is not an adverbial phrasal verb anymore because “on” here is a preposition?

    Comment above applies.

    3) but when analysing "he turned down the radio volume" I was told that "down" was an adverb because we could separated it from the verb by the object = "he turned the radio volume down".

    When this is intoned the stress is on down. Additionally, most utterances would be he turned the volume down with down after the object. In general, this would be classed a phrasal verb. Down is a particle.

    In your subject heading you write prepositional phrasal verbs VS adverbial phrasal verbs. A prepositional phrasal verb is a phrasal verb that combines with a preposition - for example look forward to. I would not use the expression adverbial phrasal verbs but rather just phrasal verb (in line with most books on the subject).
     
  5. GungaDin New Member

    English - United States
    Yet another consideration regarding the question of how direct object relate to the phrasal verb is whether the verb is transitive or intransitive; whether it can take a direct object or not respectively. Some verbs require a D.O. in order to make sense, Transitive verbs. On the other hand, Intransitive verbs cannot be followed by a D.O. Some verb combinations can be used a transitive or intransitive depending on the context.

    For example:
    Transitive:
    The fisherman pulls in the trap from the ocean. Seperable
    Intransitive:
    when my cousin comes home he pulls in too fast. Inseperable
     
  6. Hela Senior Member

    Tunis
    Tunisia - French
    Good evening Gunga,So in sentence 1 you would say that "pulls" is a verb phrase and "in the trap" an adverbial of place; in sentence 2 "pulls in" is a verb phrase and "too fast" an adverbial of manner?All the best
     

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