Prepositional phrase

bmo

Senior Member
Taiwan
I can't afford 3 weeks away from work.

Is "away from work" a prepositional (adverbial) phrase modifying verb afford?

Thanks.
 
  • Lora44

    Senior Member
    England, English
    I would say 'I can't afford to take 3 works off work', but I think that your sentence works in that I understand perfectly what you mean.
     

    cyberpedant

    Senior Member
    English USA, Northeast, NYC
    "away from work" is an adverbial phrase, right?
    Yes, it is. But this is a case where conventional grammatical explanations fall short. Perhaps the best way to think about that sentence, which is perfectly understandable, is that the verb "to be," is understood.
    I can't afford to be 3 weeks away from work.
     

    languageGuy

    Senior Member
    USA and English
    'Away from work' is not a prepositional phrase, because 'away' is an adjective, not a prepostion, and such phrases must begin with a prepositon. 'From work' is a prepositional phrase used as an adverb to modify 'away.' The whole phrase 'away from work' is adjectival used to modify weeks.

    Does this help?
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    'Away from work' is not a prepositional phrase, because 'away' is an adjective, not a prepostion, and such phrases must begin with a prepositon. 'From work' is a prepositional phrase used as an adverb to modify 'away.' The whole phrase 'away from work' is adjectival used to modify weeks.

    Does this help?
    Yes.

    I think I had "brain-lock". Why was I thinking "away" was a preposition? :eek:

    Gaer
     

    danielfranco

    Senior Member
    Now I feel stupid. All this time I thought that a prepositional phrase was a modifying phrase that acted as a preposition for the main sentence, regardless of which kind of word was the first word of the phrase.
    Well, duh.
     
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