Prepositions and accusative pronouns

elroy

Imperfect Mod
US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
Hello,

According to my book, the accusative pronouns niego, nią, nie, and nich are used only after prepositions. I'm interested in knowing whether the converse is also true, i.e. are these forms required after prepositions, or is it possible to say, for example, Czekam na go?

Using czekać na as an example, could you tell me which of the following is possible, if any?

Czekam na go.
Czekam na jego.
Czekam na ją.
Czekam na je.
Czekam na ich.

Bardzo dziękuję. :)
 
  • Jana337

    Senior Member
    čeština
    I agree; the short ones are weird. :)

    But the emphatic one sounds fine: Czekam na jego (i nie na ciebie)!

    :confused:
     

    cajzl

    Senior Member
    Czech
    It is customary in many (if not all) Slavic languages that the personal pronouns have ň (palatal nasal) instead of j after the prepositions. It is usually true for all cases and all prepositions.

    If you are interested this is an explanation:

    In Protoslavic the common prepositions v (in), k (to) and s (with) had the following forms: vъn, kъn, sъn;
    hence vъn jemь -> vъ njemь
     

    Jana337

    Senior Member
    čeština
    *Rethinking it*

    You were right, Anatoli. :eek: I don't know what I was thinking. I am still quite sure that "jego" can be a personal pronoun but not after a preposition. :eek:
     

    dn88

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Czekam na niego. :tick:
    Czekam na jego. :cross:

    As to "jego", it can be used as the personal pronoun, chiefly at the beginning of a sentence, e.g.

    Jego nie da się usprawiedliwić.

    But it's wrong (or at least it's harsh to my ears) to use "jego" somewhere in the middle of a sentence:

    Nie da się jego usprawiedliwić.

    I would definitely say:

    Nie da się go usprawiedliwić.
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    Just to add something more; it may be sometimes possible to use jego somewhere in the middle of a sentence when we want to stress that's he (it is very often juxtaposed with another contrasting element):
    Wysłał tam jego a nie mnie, bardzo mnie to zabolało ponieważ nie kiwnął nawet palcem przy tym projekcie.
    Rozmawialismy o nim przez telefon i nie uwierzysz; to właśnie jego chcą zatrudnić mimo gorszych kwaliwikacji od większości kandydatów.
    In these sentences I wouldn't use go at all.



    Tom
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Thanks to everyone for your responses. :) I'm familiar with the difference between jego and go; that wasn't my primary question. I just wanted to know if the prepositions could ever take any "non-n pronouns." I suppose the answer is "no," which (I think) I'm happy to hear. :)
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    Thanks to everyone for your responses. :) I'm familiar with the difference between jego and go; that wasn't my primary question. I just wanted to know if the prepositions could ever take any "non-n pronouns." I suppose the answer is "no," which (I think) I'm happy to hear. :)
    If you have personal pronouns in mind then, I believe, it is true. :)


    Tom
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Yes, I'm only talking about personal pronouns here. Sorry, I should have made that clearer. :)
     
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