presence of <the sublime>

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gil12345

Senior Member
chinese
Hi,


I have a quote from Kant which confuses me.



  1. Whereas the beautiful is limited, the sublime is limitless, so that the mind in the presence of the sublime, attempting to imagine what it cannot, has pain in the failure but pleasure in contemplating the immensity of the attempt.

I think it means that " the objective beauty of the real world is limited, while the subjective beauty of the mind trying to figure out what we--human beings can't do, is limitless. When our minds fail to get the answer, we may feel painful. However, the endeavor per se amazes us for it shows us the various possibility.


Am I right?

Gil

 
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  • perpend

    Banned
    American English
    Yes, I thing you've captured the meaning, Gil.

    I might say:

    Objective beauty is limited, but something "sublime" is limitless, so our minds, attempting to imagine something that it can't (it's unattainable), sometimes get frustrated, since it cannot be attained, but there is nonetheless joy in contemplating the myriad ways of trying to achieve the sublime.
     

    gil12345

    Senior Member
    chinese
    Yes, I thing you've captured the meaning, Gil.

    I might say:

    Objective beauty is limited, but something "sublime" is limitless, so our minds, attempting to imagine something that it can't (it's unattainable), sometimes get frustrated, since it cannot be attained, but there is nonetheless joy in contemplating the myriad ways of trying to achieve the sublime.
    Thanks

    Gil
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Hi,


    I have a quote from Kant which confuses me.



    1. Whereas the beautiful is limited, the sublime is limitless, so that the mind in the presence of the sublime, attempting to imagine what it cannot, has pain in the failure but pleasure in contemplating the immensity of the attempt.

    I think it means that " the objective beauty of the real world is limited, while the subjective beauty of the mind trying to figure out what we--human beings can't do, is limitless. When our minds fail to get the answer, we may feel painful. However, the endeavor per se amazes us for it shows us the various possibility.


    Am I right?

    Gil

    I'm not at all clear that you are. Kant seems to be explaining the difference between beauty and sublimity.

    The two adjectives in your opening sentence, objective and real, raise as many problems as they solve, it seems to me.

    There are people who would claim, for instance, that our appreciation of beauty is entirely a subjective matter.

    If I were you I'd let Kant get on with his explanation, and then talk to a competent philosopher on the topic.

    I don't think you are putting what is really a linguistic question.
     
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