Present instead of present perfect continuous

Discussion in 'English Only' started by facarraro, Mar 13, 2018.

  1. facarraro

    facarraro New Member

    Portuguese
    Hey guys,

    Just a quick one. I know that I'm supposed to say:

    "I've been living in Russia for 10 years."

    But, what if I say "I live in Russia for 10 years." - is it a possibility or just plain wrong?

    Thanks a lot!
     
  2. The Newt

    The Newt Senior Member

    USA / EEUU
    English - US
    Just plain wrong, I'm afraid.
     
  3. PaulQ

    PaulQ Senior Member

    UK
    English - England
    There ain't no such animal as "a quick one."

    I can think of a context in which "I live in Russia 10 years" would be correct, but you need to give a "slow one" - one with context. :):thumbsup:
     
  4. Florentia52

    Florentia52 Modwoman in the attic

    Wisconsin
    English - United States
    It would take a very constrained and unusual context to make "I live in Russia for ten years" correct. What context did you have in mind?

    [Cross-posted with The Newt and PaulQ]
     
  5. facarraro

    facarraro New Member

    Portuguese
    Good to know!

    The context I had in mind was the same one that "I've been living in Russia for 10 years." expresses. If the other version is just wrong, great then.

    Thanks a lot y'all :)
     
  6. dojibear Senior Member

    Fresno CA
    English - Northeast US
    I have been living in Russia (for) 10 years.:tick:
    I have lived in Russia (for) 10 years.:tick:
    I live in Russia (for) 10 years.:cross:
     
  7. PaulQ

    PaulQ Senior Member

    UK
    English - England
    Bill: "Wait! I have this plan! I buy a fur hat; I go to Moscow; I live in Russia for 10 years; I learn perfect Russian and then I infiltrate the GRU headquarters and get all their secrets... What do you think?"
    John: "Call the ambulance, Bill has been taken ill again..."
     
  8. natkretep

    natkretep Moderato con anima (English Only)

    Singapore
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Yes, the simple present is very restricted in today's English. It's used for universal truths (which doesn't apply for your case) or for story telling in the 'historical present' or for future plans (as illustrated in Paul's example).
     

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