Present perfect continuity

lingkky

Senior Member
chinese
I have the problem in determining whether an action is still going on or not necessary when different verbs are used in forming present perfect tense.


I have lived here for five years. (The action is going on)

I have tried for a minute. (The action may or may not be going on)

He have slept for two hours. (Is it going on or not necessary ???)

I meet problem to determine whether the action is going on when coming to some new verbs like(sleep,play ,....) .

Is there a way to know whether the action is still going on or not necessary (present perfect) ?
 
  • se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I think you are confusing the present perfect continuous with the present perfect simple.
    - The present perfect continuous indicates that an action has been going on continuously or continually for a period leading up to the present. So I have been doing it indicates that the action has been taking place over this kind of time period.
    - The simple present perfect tense indicates a present state arising from past action. So I have done it may indicate that it is now done.

    Stative verbs are different, but "try" and "sleep" are not stative verbs.
     
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    lingkky

    Senior Member
    chinese
    I think you are confusing the present perfect continuous with the present perfect simple.
    - The present perfect continuous indicates that an action has been going on continuously or continually for a period leading up to the present. So I have been doing it indicates that the action has been taking place over this kind of time period.
    - The simple present perfect tense indicates a present state arising from past action. So I have done it may indicate that it is now done.

    Stative verbs are different, but "try" and "sleep" are not stative verbs.
    Yes.The point is stative verbs which mean the action is going on in simple present perfect structure

    Question.1
    What are stative verbs?
    How can I derermine them?

    Question 2.
    “He has lived here”
    Does this sentence mean he is still living here?
     

    se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Stative verbs are introduced here: Stative verbs

    "He has lived here" does not necessarily mean that he is still living here. Because "live" is (or can be) a stative verb, "He has lived here" can have two completely different meanings.
    1) It can indicate the period of past time leading up to the present during which it happened: He has lived (or been living) here for six months
    2) It can indicate that his living here has a present consequence:
    He has lived here: he knows the area well.
    He has lived here: I can feel the presence of his spirit.
     
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    lingkky

    Senior Member
    chinese
    Stative verbs are introduced here: Stative verbs

    "He has lived here" does not necessarily mean that he is still living here. Because "live" is (or can be) a stative verb, "He has lived here" can have two completely different meanings.
    1) It can indicate the period of past time leading up to the present during which it happened: He has lived (or been living) here for six months
    2) It can indicate that his living here has a present consequence:
    He has lived here: he knows the area well.
    He has lived here: I can feel the presence of his spirit.
    Simple Present perfect
    He has lived here.(not necessary he is living here)
    He has lived here for six months.(he is living here)

    Simple present continuous
    He has been living here.(not necessary he is living here)
    He has been living here for six months.(he is living here)

    Only the sentences with the time interval (six months) tell us that he is now living here.
    Are they correct?
     

    se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Live is difficult because it can be used as a stative verb and it can be used as a dynamic verb.

    So
    I have been living here (present perfect continuous form) can only have the present perfect continuous sense
    - I have lived here and know the area well.

    But I have lived here (present perfect simple form) can have either present perfect sense.
    - I have lived here for five years.
    - I have lived here and know the area well.
     

    lingkky

    Senior Member
    chinese
    Live is difficult because it can be used as a stative verb and it can be used as a dynamic verb.

    So
    I have been living here (present perfect continuous form) can only have the present perfect continuous sense
    - I have lived here and know the area well.

    But I have lived here (present perfect simple form) can have either present perfect sense.
    - I have lived here for five years.
    - I have lived here and know the area well.
    Can we say "he has been living here peacefully " if he no longer lives here?
    He moved to other already.

    What does "I have lived here and know the area well. " mean?
    Is the speaker still living there?
     
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    se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Can we say "he has been living here peacefully " if he no longer lives here?
    He moved to other already.
    What does "I have lived here and know the area well. " mean?
    Is the speaker still living there?
    Neither if these is clear about whether he lives there now. The present perfect tense provides no information on this subject.
     
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    se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Live is difficult because it can be used as a stative verb and it can be used as a dynamic verb.

    So
    I have been living here (present perfect continuous form) can only have the present perfect continuous sense
    - I have lived here and know the area well.

    But I have lived here (present perfect simple form) can have either present perfect sense.
    - I have lived here for five years.
    - I have lived here and know the area well.
    I should have added that there are various other cases when the simple present perfect form is used in a present perfect sense, for example in the passive.
     
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