present perfect simple/ present perfect continuous - with enjoy

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Arcona

Senior Member
German
Hello,

please imagine the following situation:
I've just finished reading the first chapters of a book that a friend gave me and I want to tell him that.
I think I could write:
1) I've just been enjoying the first chapters of your book.
or
2) I've just enjoyed the first chapters of your book.

but I don't know which one is the better choice. I don't quite understand the difference between the two sentences in this context.
I learned that the present perfect simple suggests completion while the continuous suggests something is unfinished.
My confusion is because I finished the first chapters (completion = present perfect simple) but I have not finished the book yet (unfinished = present perfect continuous).

I would prefer 1), somehow it sounds better to me. (Because I want my sentence to imply that I will continue reading his book later (tonight or tomorrow). Would you agree with my choice?

Thank you.
 
  • dojibear

    Senior Member
    AE (US English)
    I think both are correct (if not, someone else can find the error).

    I prefer 1, because "been enjoying" clearly shows that the "enjoying" was happening for a period of time: the whole time you were reading this book.
     

    Meollo Delasunto

    New Member
    English
    I’m sure that many people will disagree, but I personally find it somewhat affected and quirky when the word “enjoy” is used in place of the action that is being described as enjoyable. I would prefer something like this: “I enjoyed reading the first chapters of your book, and I look forward to reading the rest."
     

    Arcona

    Senior Member
    German
    Thank you very much for your replies.
    I think I will open a new thread for what you said, Meollo.

    I have one more question. If I say:
    I've just been enjoying the first chapters of your book.
    does the "just" imply that I finished reading the first chapters directly before writing my sentence?
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    AE (US English)
    In that sentence "just" means roughly the same as "just now". But it doesn't have to be "seconds". It could be minutes or hours. Time statements are flexible.

    And it depends on context. Getting a college degree requires 4 years. So someone might say "I just got my diploma" two or three months after the graduation ceremony.
     
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