Present tense in colloquial

  • pcy0308

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Hello Amirali1383koohi,
    I mean, depending on different verbs and how casual you want to sound, there are many different, "colloquial" way of saying things in Korean.

    For example,
    "학교 갑니다" which sounds more or less literary could be expressed like "(나) 학교가", "학교 가는데", "학교 갈거야", "학교 간다". Hope this helps.
     

    Amirali1383koohi

    Senior Member
    Persian
    Thanks for help but i have a quastion
    What is the diffrence between them ?
    I mean what is the diffrence between "(나) 학교가", "학교 가는데", "학교 갈거야", "학교 간다 ?
     
    Last edited:

    pcy0308

    Senior Member
    Korean
    In a literal sense, they all mean the same thing: "I am going to school".
    There indeed are subtle differences in nuance. For example, "(나) 학교가" would probably be the most ordinary way of saying you are going to school' "(나) 학교 가는데" kinda sounds like "I am going to school, but why?" Then again, it could simply be used as "I am going to school", just as how "yeah" in English could be used in difference situations either to affirm something or to inquire something. "학교 갈거야" and "학교 간다" just like the previous two mean the exact same thing, but the former sounds like what you'd say if someone were to ask you "what are you gonna do now/then?" while the latter is more or less immediate and declarative, just simply "declaring" what you are about to do now. Hope this helps.
     

    lizmea

    New Member
    Korean - Seoul, South Korea
    In a literal sense, they all mean the same thing: "I am going to school".
    There indeed are subtle differences in nuance. For example, "(나) 학교가" would probably be the most ordinary way of saying you are going to school' "(나) 학교 가는데" kinda sounds like "I am going to school, but why?" Then again, it could simply be used as "I am going to school", just as how "yeah" in English could be used in difference situations either to affirm something or to inquire something. "학교 갈거야" and "학교 간다" just like the previous two mean the exact same thing, but the former sounds like what you'd say if someone were to ask you "what are you gonna do now/then?" while the latter is more or less immediate and declarative, just simply "declaring" what you are about to do now. Hope this helps.
    Such a great explanation, I must say!
    I would also like to add that there could be even more expressions if the speaker was to speak to someone older -- that is, honorific forms. Interestingly, we have "colloquial honorific" forms... for example, "(저) 학교(에) 가요", "학교(에) 갈거예요", "학교(에) 가려구요", "학교 갈래요" so on and so forth.
     
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