pretty wicked / wicked cool

perpend

Banned
American English
I'm asking this to members on the East Coast of the USA.

Context: That's downright amazing.

1) That's pretty wicked.
2) That's wicked cool.
 
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  • perpend

    Banned
    American English
    Sorry. You are right. That was a very vague question.

    I was wondering if 1) or 2) or both would be acceptable for people who use "wicked" in speech on the East Coast, to convey something similar to "That's downright/really amazing".
     

    dadane

    Senior Member
    English (London/Essex)
    Context: That's downright amazing.
    1) That's pretty wicked.
    Sorry to butt my oar in on AE thread but, "that's pretty wicked" in this sense is pretty standard London/Estuary. I have no idea if it was adopted from East Coast AE.

    Edit. I am not familiar with "that's wicked cool" but the meaning is abundantly clear, if I heard it in an MLE accent, I wouldn't bat an eyelid.
     
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    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    I think you can rely on Urbandictionary here:
    Wicked
    2987 up, 521 down

    October 31, 2005 Urban Word of the Day
    New England slang that adds emphasis. Synonymous with really, very and hella.

    To describe how great something is: "This car is wicked cool!"
    To show aggravation: "This fucking guy is a wicked asshole!"
    To show frustration: "That guy is wicked slow!"
    To show amazement: "Wow, that game is wicked awesome!"
    To describe a person: "She's a wicked bitch!"
    To describe the weather: "Man, it's wicked hot out here!"
    To emphasize feelings: "That story made me wicked sad!"
    To exaggerate your point: "That took a wicked long time!"
    "That wicked cool car is wicked fast is owned by that wicked old guy, who drives it wicked slow when it's wicked hot out, which makes me wicked sad cause I'm wicked broke and I got to walk a wicked long way."
    Sorry of all the examples, but they emphasise how common it is -> in fact, it's wicked...
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    Interesting, I didn't know it was British English and Canadian English as well. It makes me think that it came to us (the US and Canada) from England then.

    I associate it with the Boston region of the USA, and I don't even know why.

    You can "butt your oar" (never heard that!) in any of my threads, dadane, as long as I can "rebut(t)". :)

    Cross-posted: Thanks, Paul. So it seems like it goes before an adjective, and is mostly an adverb?
     

    dadane

    Senior Member
    English (London/Essex)
    There is clearly a slight difference. The BE version is primarily adjectival.

    "That's a wicked car"!
    "I've just won 500 quid on the lottery", "Wow, that's wicked"!

    I have also heard it used as an adverb but this is much rarer in my experience, the adverb 'wickedly' is sometimes used. The problem is, I haven't lived in the East End for seven years so I'm a bit out of touch.
     
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