prevents us from missing out small bugs on the website.

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atakeris

Senior Member
Latvian
Hello,

Case: That prevents us from missing out small bugs on the website.

I want to say that "THAT" allows us not to leave any bugs and fix them before launching the website. Should I use just "miss" or "miss out"? Maybe any other phrasal verb? Thanks!
 
  • Glenfarclas

    Senior Member
    English (American)
    "Miss out" is definitely the wrong phrase. It means "Not receive or be a part of something that you would have enjoyed," and it takes "on" before the object: "Let's stay a bit longer so we don't miss out on the cake."
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    to miss out (intransitive) on something = to be deprived of the opportunity [to do something.] "He broke his leg so he missed out on the trip to France."

    to miss (transitive) something = to overlook; to allow to go unnoticed, etc.
     
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