Principality of Wales

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AlexanderIII

Senior Member
Russian

Hello, everybody!

According to my dictionary the word "Principality" means Wales. Does Principality of Wales mean just Wales or the executive system of the country or something else?

Thank you.
 
  • envie de voyager

    Senior Member
    english-canadian
    A principality is an area where the (figurative) head of state is a prince. Wales is sometimes refered to as a principality because the person next in line for the British throne is known as The Prince of Wales.
     
    An empire is a land whose real or nominal ruler is an emperor.
    Ancient Rome was an Empire.
    China was an empire before 1912.
    Russia was an empire before 1917.
    Japan is an empire.

    A kingdom is a land whose real or nominal ruler is a king.
    Norway is a kingdom.
    Thailand is a kingdom.
    Tonga is a kingdom.

    A principality is a land whose real or nominal ruler is a prince.
    Wales is a principality.
    Monaco is a principality.
    Lichtenstein is a principality.
     

    TriglavNationalPark

    Senior Member
    Slovenian (a.k.a. Slovene)
    An empire is a land whose real or nominal ruler is an emperor.
    Ancient Rome was an Empire.
    China was an empire before 1912.
    Russia was an empire before 1917.
    Japan is an empire.

    A kingdom is a land whose real or nominal ruler is a king.
    Norway is a kingdom.
    Thailand is a kingdom.
    Tonga is a kingdom.

    A principality is a land whose real or nominal ruler is a prince.
    Wales is a principality.
    Monaco is a principality.
    Lichtenstein is a principality.
    And a duchy is a land whose real/nominal ruler is a duke. Luxembourg comes to mind.
     

    Flaminius

    coclea mod
    日本語 / japāniski / יפנית
    An empire is a land whose real or nominal ruler is an emperor.
    . . . .
    Japan is an empire.
    The so-called emperor of Japan is not the real or nominal ruler of the country. The latter was the case until 1945. Today, it is customary to accord the emperor with treatment for the head of state in ceremonial diplomatic protocols, but he has no political powers in the government.

    Japan is not exactly a republic nor an empire, but then what it is in this categorisation is a tough question to answer.
     

    TriglavNationalPark

    Senior Member
    Slovenian (a.k.a. Slovene)
    Today, it is customary to accord the emperor with treatment for the head of state in ceremonial diplomatic protocols, but he has no political powers in the government.
    Right, but this is also true in the case of all European monarchies. In a constitutional monarchy, the role of the king or the queen is almost exclusively ceremonial. He or she is still the nominal head-of-state, however.

    EDIT: Flaminius points out the Emperor of Japan is not officially the country's head-of-state, so Japan is a different case after all.
     
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