print/print out

loureed4

Senior Member
Spanish
Hi all!,

I wonder if I could say just: "Print it" (some documents someone sent me by email) rather than "Print it out"
My doubt is: What does "out" add in meaning to "Print it" ?

But, if the sentence is longer like: "Print all the documents Peter sent you out" vs "Print all the documents Peter sent you"

Thanks in advance!
 
  • blasita

    Senior Member
    Spain. Left nine years ago
    'Print something out' is a phrasal verb which means to produce a copy of a computer document from a printer. 'Print off' is used too.

    'Print' is more general; it includes e.g. printing books and printing out from a computer.

    So, I think that, in general, it is possible to use both in this case, but 'print something out' is very common.

    Hope this helps. Un saludo.
     

    sound shift

    Senior Member
    English - England
    This "out" actually means something. Because "out" is the opposite of "in", "Print out all the documents Peter sent you" imples that these documents are in something, namely the computer. "Print them out" means "Get copies out of the computer, by using the printer". I would not say "Print all the documents Peter sent you" in this context and would be surprised if I heard a native speaker say it in this context. I wouldn't call this "print out" a phrasal verb. It is just a verb + preposition combination in my view.

    Saludos.
     
    Last edited:

    blasita

    Senior Member
    Spain. Left nine years ago
    I would not say "Print all the documents Peter sent you" in this context and would be surprised if I heard a native speaker say it in this context. I wouldn't call this "print out" a phrasal verb. It is just a verb + preposition combination in my view.

    Muchos sí lo consideran un 'phrasal verb' (como p. ej.: http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/british/print-sth-out?q=print+out#print-sth-out__2, http://www.macmillandictionary.com/dictionary/british/print-out). De todas formas, a veces es una cuestión de terminología, y lo que unos llaman 'phrasal' otros 'prepositional' en algunos casos: en mi opinión esto no es muy importante, al menos no en la práctica.

    Yo tampoco usaría 'print a document' sino 'print a document out' (aunque mi opinión no sirva), pero creo que no sería incorrecto decir solamente 'print' en muchos casos. De hecho, recuerdo haber leído otros hilos sobre esto (que no he buscado todavía, pero lo puedo intentar), aunque te puedo asegurar que me fío totalmente de tu palabra, Sound.:)
     
    Last edited:

    loureed4

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    I get the point. I just thought I could say "Print it" , but apparently I need to use "out" , very good to know :)

    Thanks both for your help!
     

    loureed4

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Thanks Blasita, I appreciate your help, maybe I am making a mountain ot of a mole-hill , When I live there, probably someone will tell me: Use "out" after print , hehe, I mean in UK or The Netherlands, where I intend to go soon.

    Thanks again!
     

    blasita

    Senior Member
    Spain. Left nine years ago
    Thanks Blasita, I appreciate your help, maybe I am making a mountain ot of a mole-hill , When I live there, probably someone will tell me: Use "out" after print , hehe, I mean in UK or The Netherlands, where I intend to go soon.

    De nada. Lo siento, me temo que no lo he dejado claro en mi primer comentario: quería haber dicho de manera más clara que 'print out' (y 'print off', que lo he oído bastante en los EE. UU.) es lo que se dice, especialmente en tu ejemplo. Pero como este hilo está en el foro de gramática inglés-español y es mi intención que sirva también a otros, he intentado decir que me parece que 'print' es en algunos casos y registros también correcto: me gustaría que alguien me quitara la razón.:)
     

    loureed4

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    I understand Blasita :). You´re always of great help, I mean it! I didn´t know "print off" by the way, it´s good to know those little nuances! . Are you leaving in the US ? That sounds great! :)

    Thanks!!!
     

    gringuitoloco

    Senior Member
    American (awesome) English
    Although I think it is acceptable to just "print something" from a computer or what have you, I would also like to add that it doesn't have to be "print something out." Especially if the "something" is longer...
    Using your example, I would say: "Print out all the documents (that) Peter sent (to) you."
     

    loureed4

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    I see, thanks grinuitoloco.

    Definitily "Print out" then , but, If I used "Print" , it should be in a context like this maybe?: "Print the book before the boss arrives" (not a pdf-book from a computer but a real book, in order to have some copies from an actual book , a real book.

    Thanks again!
     

    gringuitoloco

    Senior Member
    American (awesome) English
    Think of it like this:
    Print is general; print out is specific.

    You can print or print out something from a computer, but you would only print a book/newspaper/etc (unless you printed it from a computer).
     

    kw10

    Senior Member
    English (USA)
    You can print or print out something from a computer, but you would only print a book/newspaper/etc (unless you printed it from a computer).

    Exactly as gringuitoloco says. A lot of times "print" and "print out" are used interchangeably, especially in casual conversation. For example, my boss might tell me:

    "Could you print that article I just emailed you?"
    OR: "Could you print out that article I just emailed you?"

    and they mean the same thing.

    But if you're talking about a book, it would only be print: "The book will be printed in May." (not "printed out")
     
    Top