prior to implant

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VicNicSor

Banned
Russian
At Luther Stapes Center For Reproductive Medicine, a doctor talks with Scully about a former doctor, who was fired, because:
-- We have reason to believe Dr Kendrick was tampering with genetic material of fertilised ova in the lab prior to implant. Experimenting with eugenics.
The X-Files, TV series

Implant here cannot be a verb, right? Hence, it's a countable noun. How can it not take an article here? Thank you.
 
  • RedwoodGrove

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    This is yet another ambiguity in the English language. "Implant", here, is like an institution, such as any medical procedure, e.g. abortion, lobotomy, open heart surgery, etcetera. they don't tend to take articles. I can't say exactly why.
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    This is yet another ambiguity in the English language. "Implant", here, is like an institution, such as any medical procedure, e.g. abortion, lobotomy, open heart surgery, etcetera. they don't tend to take articles. I can't say exactly why.
    In this case it should have been a different word: "implantation", shouldn't it?
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    At Luther Stapes Center For Reproductive Medicine, a doctor talks with Scully about a former doctor, who was fired, because:
    -- We have reason to believe Dr Kendrick was tampering with genetic material of fertilised ova in the lab prior to implant. Experimenting with eugenics.
    The X-Files, TV series

    Implant here cannot be a verb, right? Hence, it's a countable noun. How can it not take an article here? Thank you.
    I hope you are religiously keeping a list of examples in English where even the best formulation of rules guidances have exceptions:D Seems pretty clear that "implant" i being used as a noun. We have to fill the rocket with fuel before launch. That's another example of the same structure.
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    "Launch" meaning "an act or instance of launching" is a normal noun:). But "implant" means an object that is implanted, not an act of implantation. So, even when the doctor used 'implant' this way, he was not... well, not correct:D, right?
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    "Launch" meaning "an act or instance of launching" is a normal noun:). But "implant" means an object that is implanted, not an act of implantation. So, even when the doctor used 'implant' this way, he was not... well, not correct:D, right?
    Do you also have a list of neologisms? It is a new word or a word that is being used with a new usage. (see #2)
     

    RedwoodGrove

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    But "implant" means an object that is implanted, not an act of implantation. So, even when the doctor used 'implant' this way, he was not... well, not correct:D, right?
    "Implant" does not only mean an object of implantation. It can also mean the act of implantation. The "implant" is the thing being implanted. This is the creation of a noun based upon a verb. I'm not much fond of it, but what can I do?
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    It's legitimate. "Implant" here is a procedure and an uncountable noun; some other medical-procedure words—such as transfusion, biopsy, examination, and others—can similarly be either countable or uncountable, depending on usage.
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    Unlike "launch", you won't find in dictionaries this word in this meaning, and also Ngram Viewer will show you some examples of "before implant", "prior to implant", but only with "implant" modyfying another word, like "placement". So, it seems to be an extremelly rare usage.:D
    Thank you everyone.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Unlike "launch", you won't find in dictionaries this word in this meaning, and also Ngram Viewer will show you some examples of "before implant", "prior to implant", but only with "implant" modyfying another word, like "placement". So, it seems to be an extremelly rare usage.:D
    Thank you everyone.
    I found quite few without it being used as a noun used adjectivally. However, your reliance on dictionaries is unwise, because it keeps you out of date, since it takes a while before they include new usages. Just live with it:D (Search for "before implant" in Google news and you'll find lots of examples - mostly in the dental field, where I suspect the largest number of such events occurs, given that it's a relatively minor procedure)
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    "Before implantation" are more newsworthy -- 393 hits in Google news:)
    But that's 4 syllables when clearly 2 will do. As Redwood Grove said, you're not going to be able to stop its increased usage, and 3 native speakers have given their opinion. Do what you like:D (No-one has agreed with you that it is incorrect, so in #7 you are not right).
     
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